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Auteur Bertrand, A.; Habasque, J.; Hattab, T.; Hintzen, N.T.; Oliveros-Ramos, R.; Gutierrez, M.; Demarcq, H.; Gerlotto, F. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) 3-D habitat suitability of jack mackerel Trachurus murphyi in the Southeastern Pacific, a comprehensive study Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 146 Numéro Pages 199-211  
  Mots-Clés anchovy; carangidae; chile; distribution models; distributions; dynamics; Ecology; ecosystem; peru; population-structure  
  Résumé South Pacific jack mackerel, Trachurus murphyi, has an ocean-scale distribution, from the South American coastline to New Zealand and Tasmania. This fish, captured by Humans since the Holocene, is nowadays heavily exploited and its population has decreased substantially since the mid-1990s. The uncertainty associated to jack mackerel population structure currently hampers management. Several hypotheses have been proposed from a single population up to several discrete populations. Still no.definitive answer was given. Determining how environmental conditions drive jack mackerel distribution can provide insights on its population structure. To do so, here we performed in three steps. First, we used satellite data to develop a statistical model of jack mackerel horizontal habitat suitability. Model predictions based on interaction between temperature and chlorophyll-a match the observed jack mackerel distribution, even during extreme El Nino event. Second, we studied the impact of oxygen and show that jack mackerel distribution and abundance is correlated to oxygen over a wide variety of scales and avoid low oxygen areas and periods. Third, on the basis of the above we built a conceptual 3D model of jack mackerel habitat in the Southeastern Pacific. We reveal the presence of a low suitable habitat along the Chilean and Peruvian coast, figuratively presenting a closed door caused by a gap in the horizontal habitat at 19-22 S and a shallow oxycline off south-centre Peru. This kind of situation likely occurs on a seasonal basis, in austral summer but also at longer temporal scales. A lack of exchanges at some periods/seasons partially isolate jack mackerel distributed off Peru. On the other hand the continuity in the habitat during most of the year explains why exchanges occur. We conclude that the more likely population structure for jack mackerel is a pelagic metapopulation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1639  
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Auteur Miller, M.J.; Bonhommeau, S.; Munk, P.; Castonguay, M.; Hanel, R.; McCleave, J.D. url  openurl
  Titre (up) A century of research on the larval distributions of the Atlantic eels: a re-examination of the data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Reviews  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés anguilla; freshwater eels; larval distribution; oceanic fronts.; Sargasso Sea; spawning area  
  Résumé The spawning areas of the Atlantic freshwater eels were discovered about a century ago by the Danish scientistJohannes Schmidt who after years of searching found newly hatched larvae of the European eel, Anguillaanguilla, and the American eel, Anguilla rostrata, in the southern Sargasso Sea. The discovery showed thatanguillid eels migrate thousands of kilometers to offshore spawning areas for reproduction, and that theirlarvae, called leptocephali, are transported equally long distances by ocean currents to their continentalrecruitment areas. The spawning sites were found to be related to oceanographic conditions several decadeslater by German and American surveys from 1979 to 1989 and by a Danish survey in 2007 and a Germansurvey in 2011. All these later surveys showed that spawning occurred within a restricted latitudinal range,between temperature fronts within the Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Sargasso Sea. New data andre-examinations of Schmidt’s data confirmed his original conclusions about the two species having someoverlap in spawning areas. Although there have been additional collections of leptocephali in various parts ofthe North Atlantic, and both otolith research and transport modelling studies have subsequently been carriedout, there is still a range of unresolved questions about the routes of larval transport and durations of migration.This paper reviews the history and basic findings of surveys for anguillid leptocephali in the North Atlantic andanalyses a new comprehensive database that includes 22612 A. anguilla and 9634 A. rostrata leptocephali, whichprovides a detailed view of the spatial and temporal distributions and size of the larvae across the Atlantic basinand in the Mediterranean Sea. The differences in distributions, maximum sizes, and growth rates of the twospecies of larvae are likely linked to the contrasting migration distances to their recruitment areas on eachside of the basin. Anguilla rostrata leptocephali originate from a more western spawning area, grow faster, andmetamorphose at smaller sizes of <70mm than the larvae of A. anguilla, which mostly are spawned further eastand can reach sizes of almost 90 mm. The larvae of A. rostrata spread west and northwest from the spawningarea as they grow larger, with some being present in the western Caribbean and eastern Gulf of Mexico. Larvaeof A. anguilla appear to be able to reach Europe by entering the Gulf Stream system or by being entrainedinto frontal countercurrents that transport them directly northeastward. The larval duration of A. anguillais suggested to be quite variable, but gaps in sampling effort prevent firm conclusions. Although knowledgeabout larval behaviour is lacking, some influences of directional swimming are implicated by the temporaldistributions of the largest larvae. Ocean–atmosphere changes have been hypothesized to affect the survivalof the larvae and cause reduced recruitment, so even after about a century following the discovery of theirspawning areas, mysteries still remain about the marine life histories of the Atlantic eels.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1464-7931 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1125  
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Auteur Mannocci, L.; Roberts, J.J.; Halpin, P.N.; Authier, M.; Boisseau, O.; Bradai, M.N.; Canadas, A.; Chicote, C.; David, L.; Di-Meglio, N.; Fortuna, C.M.; Frantzis, A.; Gazo, M.; Genov, T.; Hammond, P.S.; Holcer, D.; Kaschner, K.; Kerem, D.; Lauriano, G.; Lewis, T.; di Sciara, G.N.; Panigada, S.; Antonio Raga, J.; Scheinin, A.; Ridoux, V.; Vella, A.; Vella, J. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Assessing cetacean surveys throughout the Mediterranean Sea: a gap analysis in environmental space Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 3126  
  Mots-Clés species distribution models; tursiops-truncatus; population-structure; sperm-whales; bottle-nosed dolphins; fin whales; habitat preference; pelagos sanctuary; seasonal distribution; whales balaenoptera-physalus  
  Résumé Heterogeneous data collection in the marine environment has led to large gaps in our knowledge of marine species distributions. To fill these gaps, models calibrated on existing data may be used to predict species distributions in unsampled areas, given that available data are sufficiently representative. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of mapping cetacean densities across the entire Mediterranean Sea using models calibrated on available survey data and various environmental covariates. We aggregated 302,481 km of line transect survey effort conducted in the Mediterranean Sea within the past 20 years by many organisations. Survey coverage was highly heterogeneous geographically and seasonally: large data gaps were present in the eastern and southern Mediterranean and in non-summer months. We mapped the extent of interpolation versus extrapolation and the proportion of data nearby in environmental space when models calibrated on existing survey data were used for prediction across the entire Mediterranean Sea. Using model predictions to map cetacean densities in the eastern and southern Mediterranean, characterised by warmer, less productive waters, and more intense eddy activity, would lead to potentially unreliable extrapolations. We stress the need for systematic surveys of cetaceans in these environmentally unique Mediterranean waters, particularly in non-summer months.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2312  
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Auteur Lezama-Ochoa, A.; Grados, D.; Lebourges Dhaussy, A.; Irigoien, X.; Chaigneau, A.; Bertrand, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Biological characteristics of the hydrological landscapes in the Bay of Biscay in spring 2009 Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Oceanography  
  Volume 24 Numéro 1 Pages 26-41  
  Mots-Clés acoustics; Bay of Biscay; Biogeography; fish; horizontal distribution; hydrological structures; macrozooplankton; patterns  
  Résumé In the present study we investigated the biogeography of macrozooplankton and fish biomass in the Bay of Biscay. In this region, we defined six different landscapes based on the hydrogeographical characteristics observed in spring 2009. We then related landscape's characteristics and environmental parameters such as light attenuation depth and chlorophyll-a with macrozooplankton and fish acoustic biomass. Hydrodynamic structures together with coastal influences (river discharges, predation pressure and depth preference) and vertical thermohaline structure/mixing (feeding modes and ability to stay in preferred layers) appeared as the main factors determining the biological distribution. Besides, variance partitioning was used to assess the respective roles played by the hydrological environment, the geographical space and the biological environment alone, and their interactions. Results revealed that: (i) macrozooplankton and fish have a preference for different hydrogeographical landscapes; (ii) the association between hydrological conditions and geographical features, i.e. the spatial structure of the hydrological environment, plays a key role in the distribution of macrozooplankton; and (iii) prey-predator relationships have to be taken into account to provide a comprehensive characterization of habitat suitability.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-6006 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1109  
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Auteur Morato, T.; Gonzalez-Irusta, J.-M.; Dominguez-Carrio, C.; Wei, C.-L.; Davies, A.; Sweetman, A.K.; Taranto, G.H.; Beazley, L.; Garcia-Alegre, A.; Grehan, A.; Laffargue, P.; Murillo, F.J.; Sacau, M.; Vaz, S.; Kenchington, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Callery, O.; Chimienti, G.; Cordes, E.; Egilsdottir, H.; Freiwald, A.; Gasbarro, R.; Gutierrez-Zarate, C.; Gianni, M.; Gilkinson, K.; Wareham Hayes, V.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Hedges, K.; Henry, L.-A.; Johnson, D.; Koen-Alonso, M.; Lirette, C.; Mastrototaro, F.; Menot, L.; Molodtsova, T.; Duran Munoz, P.; Orejas, C.; Pennino, M.G.; Puerta, P.; Ragnarsson, S. a; Ramiro-Sanchez, B.; Rice, J.; Rivera, J.; Roberts, J.M.; Ross, S.W.; Rueda, J.L.; Sampaio, I.; Snelgrove, P.; Stirling, D.; Treble, M.A.; Urra, J.; Vad, J.; van Oevelen, D.; Watling, L.; Walkusz, W.; Wienberg, C.; Woillez, M.; Levin, L.A.; Carreiro-Silva, M. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Climate-induced changes in the suitable habitat of cold-water corals and commercially important deep-sea fishes in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés calcification rates; climate change; cod gadus-morhua; cold-water corals; deep-sea; envelope models; fisheries; fishes; habitat suitability modelling; lophelia-pertusa; ocean acidification; octocorals; protected areas; scleractinian corals; scleractinians; species distribution models; species distribution models; thermal tolerance; vulnerable marine ecosystems  
  Résumé The deep sea plays a critical role in global climate regulation through uptake and storage of heat and carbon dioxide. However, this regulating service causes warming, acidification and deoxygenation of deep waters, leading to decreased food availability at the seafloor. These changes and their projections are likely to affect productivity, biodiversity and distributions of deep-sea fauna, thereby compromising key ecosystem services. Understanding how climate change can lead to shifts in deep-sea species distributions is critically important in developing management measures. We used environmental niche modelling along with the best available species occurrence data and environmental parameters to model habitat suitability for key cold-water coral and commercially important deep-sea fish species under present-day (1951-2000) environmental conditions and to project changes under severe, high emissions future (2081-2100) climate projections (RCP8.5 scenario) for the North Atlantic Ocean. Our models projected a decrease of 28%-100% in suitable habitat for cold-water corals and a shift in suitable habitat for deep-sea fishes of 2.0 degrees-9.9 degrees towards higher latitudes. The largest reductions in suitable habitat were projected for the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa and the octocoral Paragorgia arborea, with declines of at least 79% and 99% respectively. We projected the expansion of suitable habitat by 2100 only for the fishes Helicolenus dactylopterus and Sebastes mentella (20%-30%), mostly through northern latitudinal range expansion. Our results projected limited climate refugia locations in the North Atlantic by 2100 for scleractinian corals (30%-42% of present-day suitable habitat), even smaller refugia locations for the octocorals Acanella arbuscula and Acanthogorgia armata (6%-14%), and almost no refugia for P. arborea. Our results emphasize the need to understand how anticipated climate change will affect the distribution of deep-sea species including commercially important fishes and foundation species, and highlight the importance of identifying and preserving climate refugia for a range of area-based planning and management tools.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000514391400001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2752  
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