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Auteur (up) Hoffle, H.; Van Damme, C.J.G.; Fox, C.; Lelievre, S.; Loots, C.; Nash, R.D.M.; Vaz, S.; Wright, P.J.; Munk, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Linking spawning ground extent to environmental factors – patterns and dispersal during the egg phase of four North Sea fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 75 Numéro 3 Pages 357-374  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; spatial distributions; cod gadus-morhua; neighbor matrices; offshore oil; generalized additive-models; dependent development rates; haddock melanogrammus-aeglefinus; pleuronectes-platessa l; whiting merlangius-merlangus  
  Résumé Previous studies have shown that four commercially important demersal species, namely Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), whiting (Merlangius merlangus), and European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), spawn in distinct areas across the North Sea. Based on two comprehensive ichthyoplankton surveys in 2004 and 2009, the present study uses generalized additive mixed models to delimit these spawning grounds using the distribution of recently spawned eggs, investigates their relationship to specific environmental conditions, and examines egg dispersal during their development. Results indicate that presence-absence of early stage eggs is more related to temporal and topographic variables, while egg densities are closely linked with hydrography. Egg distribution patterns were relatively consistent during development and only changed near hatching. Compared with historic observations, the location of the spawning grounds appeared stable on the broad scale but centres of egg abundance varied between the surveyed years. Potential effects of long-term climate change and anthropogenic short-term disturbances, such as seismic surveys, on fish reproduction are discussed, pointing out the demand for multispecies studies on these issues.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0706-652x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2316  
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Auteur (up) Huang, J.-L.; Andrello, M.; Martensen, A.C.; Saura, S.; Liu, D.-F.; He, J.-H.; Fortin, M.-J. doi  openurl
  Titre Importance of spatio-temporal connectivity to maintain species experiencing range shifts Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés climate change; climate-change; conservation; dispersal; dynamic network model; dynamics; habitat fragmentation; landscape connectivity; Ontario; package; patterns; quality; responses; species distribution  
  Résumé Climate change can affect the habitat resources available to species by changing habitat quantity, suitability and spatial configuration, which largely determine population persistence in the landscape. In this context, dispersal is a central process for species to track their niche. Assessments of the amount of reachable habitat (ARH) using static snap-shots do not account, however, for the temporal overlap of habitat patches that may enhance stepping-stone effects. Here, we quantified the impacts of climate change on the ARH using a spatio-temporal connectivity model. We first explored the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity relative to purely spatial connectivity in a changing climate by generating virtual species distributions and analyzed the relative effects of changes in habitat quantity, suitability and configuration. Then, we studied the importance of spatio-temporal connectivity in three vertebrate species with divergent responses to climate change in North America (grey wolf, Canadian lynx and white-tailed deer). We found that the spatio-temporal connectivity could enhance the stepping-stone effect for species predicted to experience range contractions, and the relative importance of the spatio-temporal connectivity increased with the reduction in habitat quantity and suitability. Conversely, for species that are likely to expand their ranges, spatio-temporal connectivity had no additional contribution to improve the ARH. We also found that changes in habitat amount (quantity and suitability) were more influential than changes in habitat configuration in determining the relative importance of spatio-temporal connectivity. We conclude that spatio-temporal connectivity may provide less biased and more realistic estimates of habitat connectivity than purely spatial connectivity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000507381000001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2705  
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Auteur (up) Jacquet, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 20 Numéro 2 Pages 135-146  
  Mots-Clés Allometric theory; animal abundance; body-size; body-size distributions; complex food webs; coral-reef fishes; diversity; Ecology; evolution; Food web; global patterns; island biogeography; population-density; species richness; tropical reefs  
  Résumé The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation.  
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  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2087  
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Auteur (up) Jorgensen, C.; Peck, M.A.; Antognarelli, F.; Azzurro, E.; Burrows, M.T.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Cucco, A.; Holt, R.E.; Huebert, K.B.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.; Metcalfe, J.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Sinerchia, M.; Steffensen, J.F.; Teal, L.R.; Domenici, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Conservation physiology of marine fishes: advancing the predictive capacity of models Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 8 Numéro 6 Pages 900-903  
  Mots-Clés atlantic cod; body-mass; climate-change; climate effects; conservation physiology; gadus-morhua; metabolic scope; modelling; ocean; species distribution; temperature  
  Résumé At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity, assessing risks for local populations, or predicting and mitigating the spread of invasive species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1432  
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Auteur (up) Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages 20151073  
  Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts  
  Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653  
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