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Auteur Becheler, R.; Cassone, A.-L.; Noel, P.; Mouchel, O.; Morrison, C.L.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre Low incidence of clonality in cold water corals revealed through the novel use of a standardized protocol adapted to deep sea sampling Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 145 Numéro Pages 120-130
Mots-Clés diversity; dispersal; disturbance; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; organisms; population-structure; asexual reproduction; Clonality; Cold-water coral; Fine-grained spatial genetic structure; gorgonian coral; lophelia-pertusa; pertusa linnaeus 1758; spatial genetic-structure; Standardized sampling
Résumé Sampling in the deep sea is a technical challenge, which has hindered the acquisition of robust datasets that are necessary to determine the fine-grained biological patterns and processes that may shape genetic diversity. Estimates of the extent of clonality in deep-sea species, despite the importance of clonality in shaping the local dynamics and evolutionary trajectories, have been largely obscured by such limitations. Cold-water coral reefs along European margins are formed mainly by two reef-building species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Here we present a fine-grained analysis of the genotypic and genetic composition of reefs occurring in the Bay of Biscay, based on an innovative deep-sea sampling protocol. This strategy was designed to be standardized, random, and allowed the georeferencing of all sampled colonies. Clonal lineages discriminated through their Multi-Locus Genotypes (MLG) at 6-7 microsatellite markers could thus be mapped to assess the level of clonality and the spatial spread of clonal lineages. High values of clonal richness were observed for both species across all sites suggesting a limited occurrence of clonality, which likely originated through fragmentation. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation analysis underlined the possible occurrence of fine-grained genetic structure in several populations of both L. pertusa and M. oculata. The two cold-water coral species examined had contrasting patterns of connectivity among canyons, with among-canyon genetic structuring detected in M. oculata, whereas L. pertusa was panmictic at the canyon scale. This study exemplifies that a standardized, random and georeferenced sampling strategy, while challenging, can be applied in the deep sea, and associated benefits outlined here include improved estimates of fine grained patterns of clonality and dispersal that are comparable across sites and among species.
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ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2257
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Auteur Boavida, J.; Becheler, R.; Choquet, M.; Frank, N.; Taviani, M.; Bourillet, J.-F.; Meistertzheim, A.-L.; Grehan, A.; Savini, A.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre Out of the Mediterranean? Post-glacial colonization pathways varied among cold-water coral species Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 46 Numéro 5 Pages 915-931
Mots-Clés biodiversity; cold-water corals; computer-program; deep-sea; deep-sea corals; genetic-structure; glacial marine refugia; glacial refugia; growth; in-situ; Last Glacial Maximum; Lophelia pertusa; lophelia-pertusa; Madrepora oculata; marine phylogeography; north-atlantic ocean; software
Résumé Aim: To infer cold-water corals' (CWC) post-glacial phylogeography and assess the role of Mediterranean Sea glacial refugia as origins for the recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Location: Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Taxon: Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata. Methods: We sampled CWC using remotely operated vehicles and one sediment core for coral and sediment dating. We characterized spatial genetic patterns (microsatellites and a nuclear gene fragment) using networks, clustering and measures of genetic differentiation. Results: Inferences from microsatellite and sequence data were congruent, and showed a contrast between the two CWC species. Populations of L. pertusa present a dominant pioneer haplotype, local haplotype radiations and a majority of endemic variation in lower latitudes. Madrepora oculata populations are differentiated across the northeastern Atlantic and genetic lineages are poorly admixed even among neighbouring sites. Conclusions: Our study shows contrasting post-glacial colonization pathways for two key habitat-forming species in the deep sea. The CWC L. pertusa has likely undertaken a long-range (post-glacial) recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic directly from refugia located along southern Europe (Mediterranean Sea or Gulf of Cadiz). In contrast, the stronger genetic differentiation of M. oculata populations mirrors the effects of long-term isolation in multiple refugia. We suggest that the distinct and genetically divergent, refugial populations initiated the post-glacial recolonization of the northeastern Atlantic margins, leading to a secondary contact in the northern range and reaching higher latitudes much later, in the late Holocene. This study highlights the need to disentangle the influences of present-day dispersal and evolutionary processes on the distribution of genetic polymorphisms, to unravel the influence of past and future environmental changes on the connectivity of cosmopolitan deep-sea ecosystems associated with CWC.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000471344900007 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2602
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Auteur Grehan, A.J.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; D'Onghia, G.; Savini, A.; Yesson, C.
Titre Towards ecosystem based management and monitoring of the deep Mediterranean, North-East Atlantic and Beyond Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 145 Numéro Pages 1-7
Mots-Clés fish; community; ecosystem based management; monitoring; climate change; conservation; fisheries; bering-sea; baltimore; canyons; cold-water coral; deep-water corals; demersal fish; habitat suitability; habitat suitability modelling; litter; norfolk; rockall bank; vulnerable marine ecosystems
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2255
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Auteur Morato, T.; Gonzalez-Irusta, J.-M.; Dominguez-Carrio, C.; Wei, C.-L.; Davies, A.; Sweetman, A.K.; Taranto, G.H.; Beazley, L.; Garcia-Alegre, A.; Grehan, A.; Laffargue, P.; Murillo, F.J.; Sacau, M.; Vaz, S.; Kenchington, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Callery, O.; Chimienti, G.; Cordes, E.; Egilsdottir, H.; Freiwald, A.; Gasbarro, R.; Gutierrez-Zarate, C.; Gianni, M.; Gilkinson, K.; Wareham Hayes, V.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Hedges, K.; Henry, L.-A.; Johnson, D.; Koen-Alonso, M.; Lirette, C.; Mastrototaro, F.; Menot, L.; Molodtsova, T.; Duran Munoz, P.; Orejas, C.; Pennino, M.G.; Puerta, P.; Ragnarsson, S. a; Ramiro-Sanchez, B.; Rice, J.; Rivera, J.; Roberts, J.M.; Ross, S.W.; Rueda, J.L.; Sampaio, I.; Snelgrove, P.; Stirling, D.; Treble, M.A.; Urra, J.; Vad, J.; van Oevelen, D.; Watling, L.; Walkusz, W.; Wienberg, C.; Woillez, M.; Levin, L.A.; Carreiro-Silva, M.
Titre Climate-induced changes in the suitable habitat of cold-water corals and commercially important deep-sea fishes in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés calcification rates; climate change; cod gadus-morhua; cold-water corals; deep-sea; envelope models; fisheries; fishes; habitat suitability modelling; lophelia-pertusa; ocean acidification; octocorals; protected areas; scleractinian corals; scleractinians; species distribution models; species distribution models; thermal tolerance; vulnerable marine ecosystems
Résumé The deep sea plays a critical role in global climate regulation through uptake and storage of heat and carbon dioxide. However, this regulating service causes warming, acidification and deoxygenation of deep waters, leading to decreased food availability at the seafloor. These changes and their projections are likely to affect productivity, biodiversity and distributions of deep-sea fauna, thereby compromising key ecosystem services. Understanding how climate change can lead to shifts in deep-sea species distributions is critically important in developing management measures. We used environmental niche modelling along with the best available species occurrence data and environmental parameters to model habitat suitability for key cold-water coral and commercially important deep-sea fish species under present-day (1951-2000) environmental conditions and to project changes under severe, high emissions future (2081-2100) climate projections (RCP8.5 scenario) for the North Atlantic Ocean. Our models projected a decrease of 28%-100% in suitable habitat for cold-water corals and a shift in suitable habitat for deep-sea fishes of 2.0 degrees-9.9 degrees towards higher latitudes. The largest reductions in suitable habitat were projected for the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa and the octocoral Paragorgia arborea, with declines of at least 79% and 99% respectively. We projected the expansion of suitable habitat by 2100 only for the fishes Helicolenus dactylopterus and Sebastes mentella (20%-30%), mostly through northern latitudinal range expansion. Our results projected limited climate refugia locations in the North Atlantic by 2100 for scleractinian corals (30%-42% of present-day suitable habitat), even smaller refugia locations for the octocorals Acanella arbuscula and Acanthogorgia armata (6%-14%), and almost no refugia for P. arborea. Our results emphasize the need to understand how anticipated climate change will affect the distribution of deep-sea species including commercially important fishes and foundation species, and highlight the importance of identifying and preserving climate refugia for a range of area-based planning and management tools.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000514391400001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2752
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Auteur Van Dover, C.L.; Aronson, J.; Pendleton, L.; Smith, S.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; Moreno-Mateos, D.; Barbier, E.; Billett, D.; Bowers, K.; Danovaro, R.; Edwards, A.; Kellert, S.; Morato, T.; Pollard, E.; Rogers, A.; Warner, R.
Titre Ecological Restoration in the Deep Sea: Desiderata Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume 44 Numéro Pages 98-106
Mots-Clés Cold-water corals; Deep-sea resource use; Hydrothermal vents; Marine policy; Restoration science
Résumé An era of expanding deep-ocean industrialization is before us, with policy makers establishing governance frameworks for sustainable management of deep-sea resources while scientists learn more about the ecological structure and functioning of the largest biome on the planet. Missing from discussion of the stewardship of the deep ocean is ecological restoration. If existing activities in the deep sea continue or are expanded and new deep-ocean industries are developed, there is need to consider what is required to minimize or repair resulting damages to the deep-sea environment. In addition, thought should be given as to how any past damage can be rectified. This paper develops the discourse on deep-sea restoration and offers guidance on planning and implementing ecological restoration projects for deep-sea ecosystems that are already, or are at threat of becoming, degraded, damaged or destroyed. Two deep-sea restoration case studies or scenarios are described (deep-sea stony corals on the Darwin Mounds off the west coast of Scotland, deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) and are contrasted with on-going saltmarsh restoration in San Francisco Bay. For these case studies, a set of socio-economic, ecological, and technological decision parameters that might favor (or not) their restoration are examined. Costs for hypothetical restoration scenarios in the deep sea are estimated and first indications suggest they may be two to three orders of magnitude greater per hectare than costs for restoration efforts in shallow-water marine systems.
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ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium
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Notes The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Marine Lab, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA.<br/>Author Address: CNRS, Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, UMR 5175, F-34033 Montpellier, France.<br/>Author Address: Duke Univ, Nicholas Inst Environm Policy Solut, Durham, NC 27708 USA.<br/>Author Address: Nautilus Minerals, Milton, Qld, Australia.<br/>Author Address: IFREMER, F-34203 Sete, France.<br/>Author Address: Stanford Univ, Woodside, CA 94062 USA.<br/>Author Address: Dept Econ & Finance, Laramie, WY 82071 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Southampton, Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.<br/>Author Address: Biohabitats, N Charleston, SC 29405 USA.<br/>Author Address: Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Life & Environm Sci, I-601321 Ancona, Italy.<br/>Author Address: Newcastle Univ, Sch Biol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England.<br/>Author Address: Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.<br/>Author Address: Univ Acores, Dept Oceanog & Pescas, Ctr IMAR, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: LARSyS Associated Lab, P-9901862 Horta, Portugal.<br/>Author Address: EURC, Biodivers Consultancy, Cambridge CB2 1RR, England.<br/>Author Address: Dept Zool, Oxford OX1 3PS, England.<br/>Author Address: Univ Wollongong, Australian Natl Ctr Ocean Resources & Secur, North Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.<br/>PB – Elsevier Sci Ltd<br/> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 342
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