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Auteur Amandé, M.; Ariz, J.; Chassot, E.; Molina, A.D. de; Gaertner, D.; Murua, H.; Pianet, R.; Ruiz, J.; Chavance, P.
Titre Bycatch of the European purse seine tuna fishery in the Atlantic Ocean for the 2003-2007 period Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources
Volume 23 Numéro 4 Pages 353-362
Mots-Clés atlantic Ocean; Bycatch; discards; Purse seining; Tuna fisheries
Résumé Bycatch of several groups of species and their characteristics are presented for the period 2003 to 2007 for the European purse seine tuna fishery operating in the Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected through French and Spanish observer programmes and represented a total of 27 trips corresponding to 2.9% coverage. Bycatch is defined as non-targeted species and small or damaged target species. Bycatch species composition, main species length, sex ratio and the fate of the most common species are presented first. Stratified ratios relative to landings of major commercial tunas were then used to estimate the total bycatch; these ratios were considered the most appropriate variable for extrapolation. Stratification was based on the fishing mode (free school vs. floating object), season (quarters) and spatial areas. The annual average bycatch was estimated at about 6400 t, corresponding to a mean annual value of 80.8 t per 1000 t of tuna landed or 7.5% of the total catch. Tunas represent 83% (67.2 t/1000 t) of the total bycatch, followed by other bony fishes (10%, 7.8 t/1000 t), billfishes (5%, 4.0 t/1000 t), sharks (1%, 0.9 t/1000 t) and rays (1%, 0.9 t/1000 t). Based on estimates of the annual bycatch, 16% was kept on board and sold in local markets.
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ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 56
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Auteur Bodin, N.; Lesperance, D.; Albert, R.; Hollanda, S.; Michaud, P.; Degroote, M.; Churlaud, C.; Bustamante, P.
Titre Trace elements in oceanic pelagic communities in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Chemosphere
Volume 174 Numéro Pages 354-362
Mots-Clés atlantic-ocean; blue marlin; Environmental risk assessment; makaira-nigricans; Marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mercury; mercury content; North Pacific; risk-assessment; Seafood; Selenium; swordfish xiphias-gladius; Tuna fisheries' bycatch
Résumé The mineral composition of target and non-target pelagic fish caught by purse-seiners and longliners in the western-central Indian Ocean was determined. From the 10 essential elements analysed, selenium and zinc showed the highest concentrations in swordfish and blue marlin while Indian mackerel appeared as a good source of copper, iron and chrome. All catch had levels of lead and cadmium, two toxic elements, below the maximum sanitary limits. Although some concerns were raised regarding mercury concentrations in the largest species (wahoo, swordfish and blue marlin), molar ratios of mercury and selenium indicate that all oceanic pelagic fish from the western-central Indian Ocean are safe for human consumption. This study also gives insights on the relationships between the levels of essential and toxic elements in fish muscle and the size, trophic position and diet sources of the studied pelagic species. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2119
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Auteur Bourjea, J.; Clermont, S.; Delgado, A.; Murua, H.; Ruiz, J.; Ciccione, S.; Chavance, P.
Titre Marine turtle interaction with purse-seine fishery in the Atlantic and Indian oceans: Lessons for management Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume 178 Numéro Pages 74-87
Mots-Clés Atlantic Ocean; Bycatch; Fishery impacts; fishery management; Indian Ocean; Marine turtle
Résumé Bycatch of endangered marine turtles is a growing issue for the management of all fisheries, including the oceanic purse-seine fishery. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial and temporal variation in bycatch rates of these species in the entire European purse-seine fishery operating in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The study was based on data collected through observer programs from 1995 to 2011. During that period, a total of 15 913 fishing sets were observed, including 6 515 on Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) and 9 398 on free swimming schools, representing a global coverage of 10.3% and 5.1% of the total fishing activity in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively. Moreover, from 2003 to 2011, 14 124 specific observations were carried out on DFADs to check turtle entanglement in the net covering DFADs. We found that the purse-seine fishery has a very low impact on marine turtles. We estimated that the annual number of individuals incidentally captured was 218 (SD = 150) and 250 (SD = 157) in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, respectively, with more than 75% being released alive. The present study also investigated the impact of DFADs; which is considered a key conservation issue for this fishery. Drifting objects may play a key role in aggregating juveniles of marine turtles, implying the need for improving their construction to avoid entanglement (e.g. avoiding nets in the structure); however, based on our study it is not the main source of incidental captures of marine turtles in this fishery.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 349
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Auteur Capietto, A.; Escalle, L.; Chavance, P.; Dubroca, L.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Murua, H.; Floch, L.; Damiano, A.; Rowat, D.; Mérigot, B.
Titre Mortality of marine megafauna induced by fisheries: Insights from the whale shark, the world’s largest fish Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Conservation
Volume 174 Numéro Pages 147-151
Mots-Clés Apparent survival; Bycatch; Hotspots of interaction; marine conservation; Megafauna; Rhincodon typus
Résumé The expansion of human activities is endangering megafauna in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. While large marine vertebrates are often vulnerable and emblematic species, many are considered to be declining, primarily due to fisheries activities. In the open ocean, certain fisheries improve their efficiency of detecting tuna schools by locating and fishing close to some macro-organisms, such as whale sharks or marine mammals. However, collecting accurate data on the accidental capture and mortality of these organisms is a complex process. We analyzed a large database of logbooks from 65 industrial vessels with and without scientific observers on board (487,272 and 16,096 fishing sets since 1980 and 1995 respectively) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Distribution maps of Sightings Per Unit of Effort highlights major hotspots of interactions between the fishery and whale sharks in the coastal area from Gabon to Angola in the Atlantic from April to September, and in the Mozambique Channel in the Indian Ocean between April and May. The incidence of apparent whale shark mortality due to fishery interaction is extremely low (two of the 145 whale sharks encircled by the net died, i.e. 1.38%). However, these two hotspots presented a relatively high rate of incidental whale shark capture. Thus, we underline the importance of estimating long-term post-release mortality rates by tracking individuals and/or by photographic identification to define precise conservation management measures.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 347
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Auteur Chaboud, C.; Vendeville, P.
Titre Evaluation of selectivity and bycatch mitigation measures using bioeconomic modelling. The cases of Madagascar and French Guiana shrimp fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources
Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 137-148
Mots-Clés Bioeconomics; Bycatch; mitigation; modelling; selectivity; Shrimp fisheries
Résumé Tropical shrimp fisheries are characterized by various interactions with their natural environment and with other fisheries. These latter interactions can be explained by the high quantity of bycatch taken by industrial trawler fleets, which has a significant impact on fish populations associated with shrimps and thus also on finfish fisheries. Bycatch also includes emblematic species, which are subject to strict conservation measures decided by the international community. It seems important to identify and assess the biological and economic consequences of different mitigation measures (increase of mesh size, turtle excluder devices and bycatch reducing devices). This communication is based on case studies undertaken on the Indian white prawn (Fenneropenaeus indicus) and speckled shrimp (Metapenaeus monoceros) fisheries in Madagascar and on the brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus subtilis) and pink spotted shrimp (Farfantepenaeus brasiliensis) fishery in French Guiana. A review of the impacts of these fisheries on resources and ecosystems is made and some results of experiments on mitigation devices given. Finally, the results of simulations obtained using a multi-species, multi-fleet, age-structured bioeconomic model, including modifications of catchability and costs related to the adoption of these devices, is presented and discussed.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 128
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