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Auteur Albo-Puigserver, M.; Munoz, A.; Navarro, J.; Coll, M.; Pethybridge, H.; Sanchez, S.; Palomera, I. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological energetics of forage fish from the Mediterranean Sea: Seasonal dynamics and interspecific differences Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 74-82  
  Mots-Clés anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; Bioenergetics; climate-change; diet composition; Energy density; environmental variability; feeding-habits; food webs; horse mackerel; Mediterranean Sea; north aegean sea; osteichthyes carangidae; sardine sardina-pilchardus; small pelagic fish  
  Résumé Small and medium pelagic fishes play a central role in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to top predators. In this study, direct calorimetry was used to analyze the energy density of seven pelagic species collected over four seasons from the western Mediterranean Sea: anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus, sardine Sardina pilchardus, round sardinella Sardinella aurita, horse mackerels Trachurus trachurus and T. mediterraneus, and mackerels Scomber scombrus and S. colias. Inter-specific differences in energy density were linked to spawning period, energy allocation strategies for reproduction and growth, and feeding ecologies. Energy density of each species varied over time, with the exception of S. colitis, likely due to its high energetic requirements related to migration throughout the year. In general, higher energy density was observed in spring for all species, regardless of their breeding strategy, probably as a consequence of the late-winter phytoplankton bloom. These results provide new insights into the temporal availability of energy in the pelagic ecosystem of the Mediterranean Sea, which are pivotal for understanding how the population dynamics of small and medium pelagic fishes and their predators may respond to environmental changes and fishing impacts. In addition, the differences found in energy density between species highlighted the importance of using species specific energy values in ecosystem assessment tools such as bioenergetic and food web models.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2176  
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Auteur Teulier, L.; Thoral, E.; Queiros, Q.; McKenzie, D.J.; Roussel, D.; Dutto, G.; Gasset, E.; Bourjea, J.; Saraux, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Muscle bioenergetics of two emblematic Mediterranean fish species: Sardina pilchardus and Sparus aurata Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Comp. Biochem. Physiol. A-Mol. Integr. Physiol.  
  Volume 235 Numéro Pages 174-179  
  Mots-Clés aerobic capacity; Bioenergetics; gait transition; Lipids; Marine fishes; metabolic fuels; pathways; physiology; Red muscle; responses; skeletal-muscle; slow; swimming performance; temperature  
  Résumé We investigated links between swimming behavior and muscle bioenergetics in two emblematic Mediterranean fish species that have very different ecologies and activity levels. European sardines Sardina pilchardus are pelagic, they swim aerobically, school constantly and have high muscle fat content. Gilthead seabream Sparus aurata are bentho-pelagic, they show discontinuous spontaneous swimming patterns and store less fat in their muscle. Estimating the proportion of red and white muscle phenotypes, sardine exhibited a larger proportion of red muscle (similar to 10% of the body mass) compared to gilthead seabream (similar to 5% of the body mass). We firstly studied red and white muscle fiber bioenergetics, using high-resolution respirometers, showing a 4-fold higher oxidation capacity for red compared to white muscle. Secondly, we aimed to compare the red muscle ability to oxidize either lipids or carbohydrates. Sardine red muscle had a 3-fold higher oxidative capacity than gilthead seabream and a greater capacity to oxidize lipids. This study provides novel insights into physiological mechanisms underlying the different lifestyles of these highly-prized species.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000481561100018 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2629  
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Auteur Theuerkauff, D.; Rivera-Ingraham, G.A.; Roques, J.A.C.; Azzopardi, L.; Bertini, M.; Lejeune, M.; Farcy, E.; Lignot, J.-H.; Sucre, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Salinity Variation in a Mangrove Ecosystem: A Physiological Investigation to Assess Potential Consequences of Salinity Disturbances on Mangrove Crabs Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Zool. Stud.  
  Volume 57 Numéro Pages 36  
  Mots-Clés Bioenergetics; blue-crab; callinectes-sapidus; carcinus-maenas; Decapods; dilocarcinus-pagei brachyura; eriocheir-sinensis; fiddler-crabs; fresh-water; grapsid crabs; Mangrove; Osmoregulation; oxidative stress; Salinity-induced oxidative stress; waste-water treatment  
  Résumé Dimitri Theuerkauff, Georgina A. Rivera-Ingraham, Jonathan A.C. Roques, Laurence Azzopardi, Marine Bertini, Mathilde Lejeune, Emilie Farcy, Jehan-Herve Lignot, and Elliott Sucre (2018) Salinity is one of the main environmental factors determining coastal species distribution. However, in the specific case of mangrove crabs, salinity selection cannot be understood through ecological approaches alone. Yet understanding this issue is crucial in the context of mangrove conservation, since this ecosystem is often used as biofilter of (low-salinity) wastewater. Crabs are keystone species in this mangrove ecosystem and are differentially affected by salinity. We hypothesize that crab salinity selection may be partly explained by specific salinity-induced physiological constraints associated with osmoregulation, energy and redox homeostasis. To test this, the response to salinity variation was analysed in two landward mangrove crabs: the fiddler crab Tubuca urvillei, which inhabits low-salinity areas of the mangrove, and the red mangrove crab Neosarmatium meinerti, which lives in areas with higher salinity. Results confirm that both species are strong hypo-/hyper-osmoregulators that deal easily with large salinity variations. Such shifts in salinity do not induce changes in energy expenditure (measured as oxygen consumption) or in the production of reactive oxygen species. However, T. urvillei is physiologically suited to habitats with brackish water, since it presents i) high hemolymph osmolalities over a wider range of salinities and lower osmoregulatory capacity in seawater, ii) high Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity in the posterior osmoregulatory gills and iii) a thicker osmoregulatory epithelium along the posterior gill lamellae. Therefore, while environmental salinity alone cannot directly explain fiddler and red mangrove crab distributions, our data suggest that salinity selection is indeed influenced by specific physiological adjustments.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1021-5506 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2424  
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