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Auteur Barnagaud, J.-Y.; Kissling, W.D.; Tsirogiannis, C.; Fisikopoulos, V.; Villeger, S.; Sekercioglu, C.H.; Svenning, J.-C. doi  openurl
  Titre Biogeographical, environmental and anthropogenic determinants of global patterns in bird taxonomic and trait turnover Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 10 Pages 1190-1200  
  Mots-Clés Anthropocene; Beta diversity; Beta-diversity; biogeographical legacies; biotic homogenization; climate changes; community; components; dispersal; functional diversity; functional diversity; life-history traits; mammal assemblages; net primary production; regional assemblages; specialization; species richness  
  Résumé AimTo assess contemporary and historical determinants of taxonomic and ecological trait turnover in birds worldwide. We tested whether taxonomic and trait turnover (1) are structured by regional bioclimatic conditions, (2) increase in relationship with topographic heterogeneity and environmental turnover and change according to current and historical environmental conditions, and (3) decrease with human impact. Major TaxaBirds. LocationGlobal. MethodsWe used computationally efficient algorithms to map the taxonomic and trait turnover of 8,040 terrestrial bird assemblages worldwide, based on a grid with 110km x 110 km resolution overlaid on the extent-of-occurrence maps of 7,964 bird species, and nine ecological traits reflecting six key aspects of bird ecology (diet, habitat use, thermal preference, migration, dispersal and body size). We used quantile regression and model selection to quantify the influence of biomes, environment (temperature, precipitation, altitudinal range, net primary productivity, Quaternary temperature and precipitation change) and human impact (human influence index) on bird turnover. ResultsBird taxonomic and trait turnover were highest in the north African deserts and boreal biomes. In the tropics, taxonomic turnover tended to be higher, but trait turnover was lower than in other biomes. Taxonomic and trait turnover exhibited markedly different or even opposing relationships with climatic and topographic gradients, but at their upper quantiles both types of turnover decreased with increasing human influence. Main conclusionsThe influence of regional, environmental and anthropogenic factors differ between bird taxonomic and trait turnover, consistent with an imprint of niche conservatism, environmental filtering and topographic barriers on bird regional assemblages. Human influence on these patterns is pervasive and demonstrates global biotic homogenization at a macroecological scale.  
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  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2212  
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Auteur Baselga, A.; Leprieur, F. url  doi
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  Titre Comparing methods to separate components of beta diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Methods Ecol Evol  
  Volume 6 Numéro 9 Pages 1069-1079  
  Mots-Clés beta diversity; community composition; dissimilarity coefficients; nestedness; replacement; richness difference; turnover  
  Résumé * Two alternative frameworks have been proposed to partition compositional dissimilarity into replacement and nestedness-resultant component or into replacement and richness-difference components. These are, respectively, the BAS (Baselga 2010, Global Ecology and Biogeography, 19, 134–143) and POD (Podani & Schmera . Oikos, 120, 1625–1638) frameworks. * We conduct a systematic comparison of parallel components in alternative approaches. We test whether the replacement components derived from the BAS and POD frameworks are independent of richness difference. We also evaluate whether previously reported tests of monotonicity between indices and ecological processes are informative to assess the performance of indices. Finally, we illustrate the consequences of differences between the BAS and POD frameworks using the North American freshwater fish fauna as an empirical example. * In the BAS framework, the nestedness-resultant component (βjne or βsne) accounts only for richness differences derived from nested patterns while, in the POD framework, richness-difference dissimilarity (βrich or βrich.s) accounts for all kind of richness differences. Likewise, the replacement components of both alternative methods account for different concepts. Only the replacement component of the BAS framework (βjtu or βsim) is independent of richness difference, while the parallel component in the POD framework (β−3 or β−3.s) is not (i.e. it is mathematically constrained by richness difference). * Therefore, only the BAS framework allows separating (i) the variation in species composition derived from species replacement which is independent of richness difference (i.e. not mathematically constrained by it) and (ii) the variation in species composition derived from nested patterns.  
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  ISSN 2041-210x ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Benedetti, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Adloff, F.; Ayata, S.-D. doi  openurl
  Titre Investigating uncertainties in zooplankton composition shifts under climate change scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 2 Pages 345-360  
  Mots-Clés marine biodiversity; species distribution models; north-atlantic; beta diversity; calanoid copepods; ecological-niche; envelope models; habitat-suitability; mass mortality; pseudo-absence data  
  Résumé Ensemble niche modelling has become a common framework to predict changes in assemblages composition under climate change scenarios. The amount of uncertainty generated by the different components of this framework has rarely been assessed. In the marine realm forecasts have usually focused on taxa representing the top of the marine food-web, thus overlooking their basal component: the plankton. Calibrating environmental niche models at the global scale, we modelled the habitat suitability of 106 copepod species and estimated the dissimilarity between present and future zooplanktonic assemblages in the surface Mediterranean Sea. We identified the patterns (species replacement versus nestedness) driving the predicted dissimilarity, and quantified the relative contributions of different uncertainty sources: environmental niche models, greenhouse gas emission scenarios, circulation model configurations and species prevalence. Our results confirm that the choice of the niche modelling method is the greatest source of uncertainty in habitat suitability projections. Presence-only and presence-absence methods provided different visions of the niches, which subsequently lead to different future scenarios of biodiversity changes. Nestedness with decline in species richness is the pattern driving dissimilarity between present and future copepod assemblages. Our projections contrast with those reported for higher trophic levels, suggesting that different components of the pelagic food-web may respond discordantly to future climatic changes.  
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  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Carteron, A.; Jeanmougin, M.; Leprieur, F.; Spatharis, S. url  doi
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  Titre Assessing the efficiency of clustering algorithms and goodness-of-fit measures using phytoplankton field data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Inform.  
  Volume 9 Numéro Pages 64-68  
  Mots-Clés 2-norm; Beta diversity; Cophenetic correlation coefficient; Dendrogram; Upgma; Ward's algorithm; beta-diversity; blooms; classification; communities; cophenetic correlation; environment; forest; functional diversity; som  
  Résumé Investigation of patterns in beta diversity has received increased attention over the last years particularly in light of new ecological theories such as the metapopulation paradigm and metacommunity theory. Traditionally, beta diversity patterns can be described by cluster analysis (i.e. dendrograms) that enables the classification of samples. Clustering algorithms define the structure of dendrograms, consequently assessing their performance is crucial. A common, although not always appropriate approach for assessing algorithm suitability is the cophenetic correlation coefficient c. Alternatively the 2-norm has been recently proposed as an increasingly informative method for evaluating the distortion engendered by clustering algorithms. In the present work, the 2-norm is applied for the first time on field data and is compared with the cophenetic correlation coefficient using a set of 105 pairwise combinations of 7 clustering methods (e.g. UPGMA) and 15 (dis)similarity/distance indices (e.g. Jaccard index). In contrast to the 2-norm, cophenetic correlation coefficient does not provide a clear indication on the efficiency of the clustering algorithms for all combinations. The two approaches were not always in agreement in the choice of the most faithful algorithm. Additionally, the 2-norm revealed that UPGMA is the most efficient clustering algorithm and Ward's the least. The present results suggest that goodness-of-fit measures such as the 2-norm should be applied prior to clustering analyses for reliable beta diversity measures. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 1574-9541 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Chao, A.; Chiu, C.-H.; Villeger, S.; Sun, I.-F.; Thorn, S.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chiang, J.-M.; Sherwin, W.B. doi  openurl
  Titre An attribute-diversity approach to functional diversity, functional beta diversity, and related (dis)similarity measures Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Monogr.  
  Volume 89 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-e01343  
  Mots-Clés attribute diversity; biodiversity; biological diversity; consensus; conservation; differentiation measures; diversity decomposition; evenness; framework; functional (dis)similarity; functional beta diversity; functional diversity; Hill numbers; phylogenetic diversity; quadratic entropy; similarity; species diversity; species richness; species traits; trait diversity  
  Résumé Based on the framework of attribute diversity (a generalization of Hill numbers of order q), we develop a class of functional diversity measures sensitive not only to species abundances but also to trait-based species-pairwise functional distances. The new method refines and improves on the conventional species-equivalent approach in three areas: (1) the conventional method often gives similar values (close to unity) to assemblages with contrasting levels of functional diversity; (2) when a distance metric is unbounded, the conventional functional diversity depends on the presence/absence of other assemblages in the study; (3) in partitioning functional gamma diversity into alpha and beta components, the conventional gamma is sometimes less than alpha. To resolve these issues, we add to the attribute-diversity framework a novel concept: tau, the threshold of functional distinctiveness between any two species; here, tau can be chosen to be any positive value. Any two species with functional distance >= tau are treated as functionally equally distinct. Our functional diversity quantifies the effective number of functionally equally distinct species (or “virtual functional groups”) with all pairwise distances at least tau for different species pairs. We advocate the use of two complementary diversity profiles (tau profile and q profile), which depict functional diversity with varying levels of tau and q, respectively. Both the conventional species-equivalent method (i.e., tau is the maximum of species-pairwise distances) and classic taxonomic diversity (i.e., tau is the minimum of non-zero species-pairwise distances) are incorporated into our proposed tau profile for an assemblage. For any type of species-pairwise distance matrices, our attribute-diversity approach allows proper diversity partitioning, with the desired property gamma >= alpha and thus avoids all the restrictions that apply to the conventional diversity decomposition. Our functional alpha and gamma are interpreted as the effective numbers of functionally equally distinct species, respectively, in an assemblage and in the pooled assemblage, while beta is the effective number of equally large assemblages with no shared species and all species in the assemblages being equally distinct. The resulting beta diversity can be transformed to obtain abundance-sensitive Sorensen- and Jaccard-type functional (dis)similarity profiles. Hypothetical and real examples are used to illustrate the framework. Online software and R codes are available to facilitate computations.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2620  
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