bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Aubin, J.; Callier, M.; Rey-Valette, H.; Mathe, S.; Wilfart, A.; Legendre, M.; Slembrouck, J.; Caruso, D.; Chia, E.; Masson, G.; Blancheton, J.P.; Ediwarman; Haryadi, J.; Prihadi, T.H.; Casaca, J. de M.; Tamassia, S.T.J.; Tocqueville, A.; Fontaine, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Implementing ecological intensification in fish farming: definition and principles from contrasting experiences Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev. Aquac.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 1 Pages 149-167  
  Mots-Clés agriculture; agroecology; animal production; aquaculture systems; ecosystem services; emergy accounting; environmental-impact; information; life cycle assessment; life-cycle assessment; mekong delta; perception; responsible aquaculture; sustainable aquaculture; system  
  Résumé Ecological intensification is a new concept in agriculture that addresses the double challenge of maintaining a level of production sufficient to support needs of human populations and respecting the environment in order to conserve the natural world and human quality of life. This article adapts this concept to fish farming using agroecological principles and the ecosystem services framework. The method was developed from the study of published literature and applications at four study sites chosen for their differences in production intensity: polyculture ponds in France, integrated pig and pond polyculture in Brazil, the culture of striped catfish in Indonesia and a recirculating salmon aquaculture system in France. The study of stakeholders' perceptions of ecosystem services combined with environmental assessment through Life Cycle Assessment and Emergy accounting allowed development of an assessment tool that was used as a basis for co-building evolution scenarios. From this experience, ecological intensification of aquaculture was defined as the use of ecological processes and functions to increase productivity, strengthen ecosystem services and decrease disservices. It is based on aquaecosystem and biodiversity management and the use of local and traditional knowledge. Expected consequences for farming systems consist of greater autonomy, efficiency and better integration into their surrounding territories. Ecological intensification requires territorial governance and helps improve it from a sustainable development perspective.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1753-5123 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2537  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Barrut, B.; Blancheton, J.-P.; Callier, M.; Champagne, J.-Y.; Grasmick, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Foam fractionation efficiency of a vacuum airlift—Application to particulate matter removal in recirculating systems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquacultural Engineering  
  Volume 54 Numéro Pages 16-21  
  Mots-Clés Aquaculture; Foam fractionation efficiency; Pom; Ras; Vacuum airlift  
  Résumé  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0144-8609 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 605  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Beckensteiner, J.; Kaplan, D.M.; Scheld, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Barriers to Eastern Oyster Aquaculture Expansion in Virginia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages 53  
  Mots-Clés beta regression; Chesapeake Bay; conservation; Crassostrea virginica; crassostrea-virginica; ecosystem services; impact; management; marine aquaculture; oyster aquaculture; political economics; restoration; social acceptability; spatial management; user conflicts  
  Résumé The eastern oyster once provided major societal and ecosystem benefits, but these benefits have been threatened in recent decades by large declines in oyster harvests. In many areas, recovery of oyster aquaculture faces significant societal opposition and spatial constraints limiting its ability to meet expectations regarding future food needs and provision of ecosystem services. In Virginia, oyster aquaculture has begun to expand, concurrent with an increase in subaqueous leased areas (over 130,000 acres of grounds are currently leased). Though private leases must in theory be used for oyster production, in practice, they can be held for other reasons, such as speculation or intentional exclusion of others. These factors have led to large variation over time and space in the use of leases in lower Chesapeake Bay; and privately leased grounds are now thought to be underutilized for oyster production. This research examined potential barriers to expansion of oyster aquaculture in Virginia. We first evaluated if a lack of space was limiting industry expansion and quantified temporal and spatial trends in the use and productivity of leases. Then, differences in used and non-used leases were investigated in relation to variables thought to be related to “not in my backyard” attitudes, congestion, speculation, local economic and environmental conditions. Finally, the performance of the Virginia leasing system was compared with those in other states along the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts. We found limited evidence for spatial constraints on aquaculture leasing, but strong evidence for social and regulatory inefficiencies. Although rates of lease use increased from 2006 to 2016, only 33% of leases were ever used for oyster production and about 63% of leaseholders reported no commercial harvests. Non-used leases tended to be smaller, and were found in more populated, high-income regions, consistent with both speculative and exclusionary uses. Virginia had the second lowest level of total production of cultured oysters per leased acre among the states on the East and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These results indicate that there is room for oyster aquaculture expansion in Virginia if societal, regulatory, and economic barriers can be reduced or if existing leased areas are used more efficiently.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000517583500001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2748  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Besson, M.; Allal, F.; Chatain, B.; Vergnet, A.; Clota, F.; Vandeputte, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Combining Individual Phenotypes of Feed Intake With Genomic Data to Improve Feed Efficiency in Sea Bass Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Genet.  
  Volume 10 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés Aquaculture; Feed conversation ratio; Fine phenotyping; genomic selection; Individual feed intake; Restricted feeding; selective breeding  
  Résumé Measuring individual feed intake of fish in farms is complex and precludes direct selective breeding for feed conversion ratio (FCR). Here, we estimated the individual FCR of 588 sea bass using individual rearing under restricted feeding. These fish were also phenotyped for their weight loss at fasting and muscle fat content as possible indirect indicators of FCR. The 588 fish were from a full factorial mating between parental lines divergently selected for high (F+) or low (F-) weight loss at fasting. The pedigree was known back to the great grandparents. A subset of 400 offspring and their ancestors were genotyped for 1,110 SNPs, which allowed estimating the genomic heritability of traits. Individual FCR and growth rate in aquarium were both heritable (genomic h² = 0.47 and 0.76, respectively) and strongly genetically correlated (-0.98), meaning that under restricted feeding, faster growing fish were more efficient. FCR in aquariums was significantly better for fish with two F- parents (1.38), worse for fish with two F+ parents (1.51) and intermediate (1.46) for crossbred fish (F+/F- or F-/F+). Muscle fat content was positively genetically correlated to growth rate in aquarium and during fasting. Thus, higher growth rate in aquariums, lower weight loss at fasting and fat content are all traits that could improve FCR in aquarium. Improving these traits would also improve FCR of fish in normal group rearing conditions, as we showed that groups composed of fish with good individual FCR were significantly more efficient in groups. The FCR of groups was also better when the fish composing the groups had, on average, lower estimated breeding values for growth rate during fasting (losing less weight). Thus, FCR in aquarium and weight loss at fasting are both promising to improve FCR of fish in groups. Finally, we showed that the reliability of estimated breeding values was higher (from +10% to +125%) with single-step genomic BLUP than with pedigree-based BLUP, showing that genomic data would enhance the accuracy of EBV prediction o in selection candidates from a limited number of sibs individually phenotyped for FCR in aquariums.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1664-8021 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2542  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Chary, K.; Aubin, J.; Sadoul, B.; Fiandrino, A.; Covès, D.; Callier, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra): Assessing bioremediation and life-cycle impacts Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture  
  Volume 516 Numéro Pages 734621  
  Mots-Clés Bioremediation; Culture scenario; Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA); Life cycle assessment (LCA); Sea cucumber  
  Résumé Environmental sustainability of aquaculture is a complex issue involving effects at local (e.g. benthic deterioration), regional (e.g. eutrophication) and global (e.g. catches for feed production) scales as a consequence of farming operations (e.g. waste emissions) and industrial processes involved in the product value chain. Integrating these effects using a holistic and multi-scale framework is essential to assess the environmental sustainability of innovative production systems such as Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA), in which organisms of different trophic levels are co-cultured on the same farm to minimize aquaculture waste. The environmental performances of theoretical production scenarios of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) sea cage monoculture and an open-water IMTA co-culturing of red drum and sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra) were assessed with mathematical models at local and global scales. First, the particulate waste bioremediation potential of sea cucumber production was estimated using an individual-based bioenergetic model. Second, environmental impacts of the monoculture and the IMTA systems were estimated and compared using life cycle assessment (LCA), calculated per kg of edible protein and t of product, including uncertainty analysis. Given the current limits to stocking density observed for sea cucumbers, its co-culture in sea cages suspended beneath finfish nets may decrease slightly (by 0.73%) farm net particulate waste load and benthic impact. The monoculture and IMTA showed little difference in impact because of the large difference in production scales of finfish and sea cucumber species. Removing 100% of finfish feces particulate waste requires cultivating sea cucumber at scale similar to that of finfish (1.3 kg of sea cucumber per kg of finfish). Nonetheless, LCA showed trends in IMTA performance: lower eutrophication impact and net primary production use but higher cumulative energy demand and climate change impacts, generating an impact transfer between categories. Intensification of sea cucumber culture could increase local and global environmental benefits, but further research is necessary to design rearing units that can optimize production and/or bioremediation and that can be practically integrated into existing finfish monoculture units. The methodology defined here can be a powerful tool to predict the magnitude of environmental benefits that can be expected from new and complex production systems and to show potential impact transfer between spatial scales. We recommend applying it to other IMTA systems and species associations and including socio-economic criteria to fully assess the sustainability of future seafood production systems.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000501480700048 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2679  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: