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Auteur Oppel, S.; Bolton, M.; Carneiro, A.P.B.; Dias, M.P.; Green, J.A.; Masello, J.F.; Phillips, R.A.; Owen, E.; Quillfeldt, P.; Beard, A.; Bertrand, S.; Blackburn, J.; Boersma, P.D.; Borges, A.; Broderick, A.C.; Catry, P.; Cleasby, I.; Clingham, E.; Creuwels, J.; Crofts, S.; Cuthbert, R.J.; Dallmeijer, H.; Davies, D.; Davies, R.; Dilley, B.J.; Dinis, H.A.; Dossa, J.; Dunn, M.J.; Efe, M.A.; Fayet, A.L.; Figueiredo, L.; Frederico, A.P.; Gjerdrum, C.; Godley, B.J.; Granadeiro, J.P.; Guilford, T.; Hamer, K.C.; Hazin, C.; Hedd, A.; Henry, L.; Hernández-Montero, M.; Hinke, J.; Kokubun, N.; Leat, E.; Tranquilla, L.M.F.; Metzger, B.; Militão, T.; Montrond, G.; Mullié, W.; Padget, O.; Pearmain, E.J.; Pollet, I.L.; Pütz, K.; Quintana, F.; Ratcliffe, N.; Ronconi, R.A.; Ryan, P.G.; Saldanha, S.; Shoji, A.; Sim, J.; Small, C.; Soanes, L.; Takahashi, A.; Trathan, P.; Trivelpiece, W.; Veen, J.; Wakefield, E.; Weber, N.; Weber, S.; Zango, L.; Daunt, F.; Ito, M.; Harris, M.P.; Newell, M.A.; Wanless, S.; González-Solís, J.; Croxall, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial scales of marine conservation management for breeding seabirds Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 98 Numéro Pages 37-46  
  Mots-Clés (down) Foraging range; Marine protected area; Spatial aggregation; Telemetry; Tracking; Value of information  
  Résumé Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient. Here the space use patterns of seabirds were examined to provide guidance on whether conservation management approaches should be tailored for taxonomic groups with different movement characteristics. Seabird tracking data were synthesised from 5419 adult breeding individuals of 52 species in ten families that were collected in the Atlantic Ocean basin between 1998 and 2017. Two key aspects of spatial distribution were quantified, namely how far seabirds ranged from their colony, and to what extent individuals from the same colony used the same areas at sea. There was evidence for substantial differences in patterns of space-use among the ten studied seabird families, indicating that several alternative conservation management approaches are needed. Several species exhibited large foraging ranges and little aggregation at sea, indicating that area-based conservation solutions would have to be extremely large to adequately protect such species. The results highlight that short-ranging and aggregating species such as cormorants, auks, some penguins, and gulls would benefit from conservation approaches at relatively small spatial scales during their breeding season. However, improved regulation of fisheries, bycatch, pollution and other threats over large spatial scales will be needed for wide-ranging and dispersed species such as albatrosses, petrels, storm petrels and frigatebirds.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2454  
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Auteur Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Deneubourg, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The aggregation of tuna around floating objects: What could be the underlying social mechanisms? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology  
  Volume 359 Numéro Pages 161-170  
  Mots-Clés (down) Fish Aggregating Devices; Models of aggregation; Monte Carlo multi-agents simulations; Social behavior  
  Résumé Several empirical and theoretical studies have shown how the exploitation of food sources, the choice of resting sites or other types of collective decision-making in heterogeneous environments are facilitated and modulated by social interactions between conspecifics. It is well known that many pelagic fishes live in schools and that this form of gregarious behavior provides advantages in terms of food intake and predator avoidance efficiency. However, the influence of social behavior in the formation of aggregations by tuna under floating objects (FOBs) is poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the collective patterns generated by different theoretical models, which either include or exclude social interactions between conspecifics, in the presence of two aggregation sites. The resulting temporal dynamics and distributions of populations were compared to in situ observations of tuna behavior. Our work suggests that social interactions should be incorporated in aggregative behavior to reproduce the temporal patterns observed in the field at both the individual and the group level, challenging the common vision of tuna aggregations around FOBs. Our study argues for additional data to further demonstrate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of these fish aggregations. Understanding the interplay between environmental and social factors in the associative behavior of fish with FOBs is necessary to assess the consequences of the widespread deployment of artificial FOBs by fishermen.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-5193 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 393  
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Auteur Filmalter, J.D.; Cowley, P.D.; Potier, M.; Menard, F.; Smale, M.J.; Cherel, Y.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding ecology of silky sharks Carcharhinus falciformis associated with floating objects in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 90 Numéro 4 Pages 1321-1337  
  Mots-Clés (down) atlantic; By-catch; diet; ecosystem; fad; fish aggregating devices; fish aggregation device; food-consumption; isurus-oxyrinchus; pacific-ocean; pelagic fishes; Pelagic shark; Purse-seine fishery; shortfin mako; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé The silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis is commonly associated with floating objects, including fish aggregating devices (FADs), in the Indian Ocean. While the motives for this associative behaviour are unclear, it does make them vulnerable to capture in the tuna purse seine fishery that makes extensive use of FADs. Here, the diet of 323 C. falciformis, caught at FADs in the Indian Ocean, was investigated to test the hypothesis that trophic benefits explain the associative behaviour. A high proportion of stomachs with fresh contents (57%) suggested that extensive feeding activity occurred while associated with FADs. Multiple dietary indices showed that typical non-associative prey types dominated, but were supplemented with fishes typically found at FADs. While the trophic benefits of FAD association may be substantial, our results suggest that associative behaviour is not driven solely by feeding. (C) 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2142  
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Auteur Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Ariz, J.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Forecasted consequences of simulated FAD moratoria in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans on catches and bycatches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 3 Pages 780-792  
  Mots-Clés (down) area; Bycatch; ecosystem approach to fisheries; fish aggregation device; management; Megafauna; Monte Carlo simulations; Purse-seine fishery; time; time-area restriction; tropical tuna purse-seine fishery; Tuna  
  Résumé Given the increasingly extensive use of drifting fish aggregation devices (FADs) by the purse-seine fisheries targeting tropical tunas, fishing effort restrictions have been introduced to manage tropical tuna stocks. However, these measures are focused on the protection of juvenile tunas and do not take account of the potential impact on bycatch or associated megafauna (whales and whale sharks). An iterative “fishing-day” Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to investigate the consequences on tropical tunas and bycatch of introducing extensive area 6-month moratoria on FAD activities. The model allowed for variability in a range of plausible values of the parameters characterizing the fishing operations conducted by European purse-seiners in the eastern tropical Atlantic and western Indian Oceans for the period 2005-2014. Monte Carlo simulations, using probabilities based on these fishery data, were carried out for the French and Spanish fishing fleets separately to account for differences in fishing strategies. The models predicted a decrease in FAD sets and an increase in free school sets. As a consequence, the catch of small tuna (<10 kg) decreased while the catch of large tuna (>= 10 kg) increased, leading to an overall increase in tuna catch of 100-200 tons/year/vessel in the Atlantic Ocean, and a decrease of 400-1500 tons/year/vessel in the Indian Ocean. The bycatch decreased in the Indian Ocean, while in the Atlantic Ocean billfishes, turtles and chondrichthyans bycatch increased slightly and other bony fishes decreased. Because fishing practices were modified, whale and whale shark associated sets increased slightly in the Indian Ocean.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2105  
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Auteur Lett, C.; Semeria, M.; Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Effects of successive predator attacks on prey aggregations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Theor Ecol  
  Volume 7 Numéro 3 Pages 239-252  
  Mots-Clés (down) Animal aggregation; Animal group; Attraction-repulsion model; Flock; Plant Sciences; School; Swarm; Theoretical Ecology/Statistics; Zoology  
  Résumé We study the cumulative effect of successive predator attacks on the disturbance of a prey aggregation using a modelling approach. Our model intends to represent fish schools attacked by both aerial and underwater predators. This individual-based model uses long-distance attraction and short-distance repulsion between prey, which leads to prey aggregation and swarming in the absence of predators. When intermediate-distance alignment is added to the model, the prey aggregation displays a cohesive displacement, i.e., schooling, instead of swarming. Including predators, i.e. with repulsion behaviour for prey to predators in the model, leads to flash expansion of the prey aggregation after a predator attack. When several predators attack successively, the prey aggregation dynamics is a succession of expanding-grouping-swarming/schooling phases. We quantify this dynamics by recording the changes in the simulated prey aggregation radius over time. This radius is computed as the longest distance of individual prey to the aggregation centroid, and it is assumed to increase along with prey disturbance. The prey aggregation radius generally increases during flash expansion, then decreases during grouping until reaching a constant lowest level during swarming/schooling. This general dynamics is modulated by several parameters: the frequency, direction (vertical vs. horizontal) and target (centroid of the prey aggregation vs. random prey) of predator attacks; the distance at which prey detect predators; the number of prey and predators. Our results suggest that both aerial and underwater predators are more efficient at disturbing fish schools by increasing their attack frequency at such level that the fish cannot return to swarming/schooling. We find that a mix between aerial and underwater predators is more efficient at disturbing a fish school than a single type of attack, suggesting that aerial and underwater foragers may gain mutual benefits in forming foraging groups.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1874-1738, 1874-1746 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 350  
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