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Auteur Rufino, M.M.; Bez, N.; Brind'Amour, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ability of spatial indicators to detect geographic changes (shift, shrink and split) across biomass levels and sample sizes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Indic.  
  Volume 115 Numéro Pages 106393  
  Mots-Clés aggregation; bay; coast; communities; distributions; fish; Fisheries management; Marine conservation; Monitoring; patterns; Spatial metrics; time  
  Résumé Spatial indicators are widely used to monitor species and are essential to management and conservation. In the present study, we tested the ability of 11 spatial indicators to quantify changes in species' geographic patterns: (1) spatial displacement of a patch of biomass ('shift'), (2) a spatial decrease in a patch, accompanied either by a loss of biomass ('shrink0') or (3) a relocation of the same biomass ('shrink1'), and (4) splitting of a patch into smaller patches ('split'). The geographic changes were simulated by manipulating the spatial distributions of the demersal species (observed during bottom trawl surveys). Hence, the spatial distributions of the latter being used as input data on which the manipulations were done. Additionally, other aspects of the indicators affecting the responses to the geographic changes were also tested, (1) homogeneous increase in biomass throughout the patch and (2) different sample sizes. The center of gravity (defined by latitude and longitude) was the only indicator that accurately detected the 'shift' in biomass. The index of aggregation identified a decrease in the area and biomass of the main biomass patch ('shrink0'), while the Gini index, equality area and spreading area were accurately identified a decrease in the area of the main biomass patch when total biomass did not decreased ('Shrink1'). Inertia and isotropy responded to all geographic changes, except for those in biomass or distribution area. None of the indicators successfully identified 'split' process. Likewise, one of the indicators were sensitive to a homogeneous increase in biomass or the type of spatial distribution. Overall, all indicators behaved similarly well when sample sizes exceeded 40 stations randomly located in the area. The framework developed provides an accessible and simple approach that can be used to evaluate the ability of spatial indicators to identify geographic processes using empirical data and can be extended to other indicators or geographic processes. We discuss perspectives of the development of spatial indicators especially within the application of EU's Marine Strategy Framework Directive.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition (up) Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000559801800002 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2871  
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Auteur Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Ariz, J.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Forecasted consequences of simulated FAD moratoria in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans on catches and bycatches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 3 Pages 780-792  
  Mots-Clés area; Bycatch; ecosystem approach to fisheries; fish aggregation device; management; Megafauna; Monte Carlo simulations; Purse-seine fishery; time; time-area restriction; tropical tuna purse-seine fishery; Tuna  
  Résumé Given the increasingly extensive use of drifting fish aggregation devices (FADs) by the purse-seine fisheries targeting tropical tunas, fishing effort restrictions have been introduced to manage tropical tuna stocks. However, these measures are focused on the protection of juvenile tunas and do not take account of the potential impact on bycatch or associated megafauna (whales and whale sharks). An iterative “fishing-day” Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to investigate the consequences on tropical tunas and bycatch of introducing extensive area 6-month moratoria on FAD activities. The model allowed for variability in a range of plausible values of the parameters characterizing the fishing operations conducted by European purse-seiners in the eastern tropical Atlantic and western Indian Oceans for the period 2005-2014. Monte Carlo simulations, using probabilities based on these fishery data, were carried out for the French and Spanish fishing fleets separately to account for differences in fishing strategies. The models predicted a decrease in FAD sets and an increase in free school sets. As a consequence, the catch of small tuna (<10 kg) decreased while the catch of large tuna (>= 10 kg) increased, leading to an overall increase in tuna catch of 100-200 tons/year/vessel in the Atlantic Ocean, and a decrease of 400-1500 tons/year/vessel in the Indian Ocean. The bycatch decreased in the Indian Ocean, while in the Atlantic Ocean billfishes, turtles and chondrichthyans bycatch increased slightly and other bony fishes decreased. Because fishing practices were modified, whale and whale shark associated sets increased slightly in the Indian Ocean.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2105  
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Auteur Lett, C.; Semeria, M.; Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
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  Titre Effects of successive predator attacks on prey aggregations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Theor Ecol  
  Volume 7 Numéro 3 Pages 239-252  
  Mots-Clés Animal aggregation; Animal group; Attraction-repulsion model; Flock; Plant Sciences; School; Swarm; Theoretical Ecology/Statistics; Zoology  
  Résumé We study the cumulative effect of successive predator attacks on the disturbance of a prey aggregation using a modelling approach. Our model intends to represent fish schools attacked by both aerial and underwater predators. This individual-based model uses long-distance attraction and short-distance repulsion between prey, which leads to prey aggregation and swarming in the absence of predators. When intermediate-distance alignment is added to the model, the prey aggregation displays a cohesive displacement, i.e., schooling, instead of swarming. Including predators, i.e. with repulsion behaviour for prey to predators in the model, leads to flash expansion of the prey aggregation after a predator attack. When several predators attack successively, the prey aggregation dynamics is a succession of expanding-grouping-swarming/schooling phases. We quantify this dynamics by recording the changes in the simulated prey aggregation radius over time. This radius is computed as the longest distance of individual prey to the aggregation centroid, and it is assumed to increase along with prey disturbance. The prey aggregation radius generally increases during flash expansion, then decreases during grouping until reaching a constant lowest level during swarming/schooling. This general dynamics is modulated by several parameters: the frequency, direction (vertical vs. horizontal) and target (centroid of the prey aggregation vs. random prey) of predator attacks; the distance at which prey detect predators; the number of prey and predators. Our results suggest that both aerial and underwater predators are more efficient at disturbing fish schools by increasing their attack frequency at such level that the fish cannot return to swarming/schooling. We find that a mix between aerial and underwater predators is more efficient at disturbing a fish school than a single type of attack, suggesting that aerial and underwater foragers may gain mutual benefits in forming foraging groups.  
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  ISSN 1874-1738, 1874-1746 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Filmalter, J.D.; Cowley, P.D.; Potier, M.; Menard, F.; Smale, M.J.; Cherel, Y.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding ecology of silky sharks Carcharhinus falciformis associated with floating objects in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 90 Numéro 4 Pages 1321-1337  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; By-catch; diet; ecosystem; fad; fish aggregating devices; fish aggregation device; food-consumption; isurus-oxyrinchus; pacific-ocean; pelagic fishes; Pelagic shark; Purse-seine fishery; shortfin mako; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé The silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis is commonly associated with floating objects, including fish aggregating devices (FADs), in the Indian Ocean. While the motives for this associative behaviour are unclear, it does make them vulnerable to capture in the tuna purse seine fishery that makes extensive use of FADs. Here, the diet of 323 C. falciformis, caught at FADs in the Indian Ocean, was investigated to test the hypothesis that trophic benefits explain the associative behaviour. A high proportion of stomachs with fresh contents (57%) suggested that extensive feeding activity occurred while associated with FADs. Multiple dietary indices showed that typical non-associative prey types dominated, but were supplemented with fishes typically found at FADs. While the trophic benefits of FAD association may be substantial, our results suggest that associative behaviour is not driven solely by feeding. (C) 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2142  
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Auteur Schilds, A.; Mourier, J.; Huveneers, C.; Nazimi, L.; Fox, A.; Leu, S.T. doi  openurl
  Titre Evidence for non-random co-occurrences in a white shark aggregation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol.  
  Volume 73 Numéro 10 Pages Unsp-138  
  Mots-Clés Aggregation; association patterns; behavior; Carcharodon carcharias; carcharodon-carcharias; dispersion; evolution; Gregariousness; neptune islands; Photo-ID; population-structure; segregation; Social behaviour; social interactions; Social network analysis; zealand fur-seal  
  Résumé Groups or aggregations of animals can result from individuals being attracted to a common resource or because of synchronised patterns of daily or seasonal activity. Although mostly solitary throughout its distribution, white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) seasonally aggregate at a number of sites worldwide to feed on calorie-rich pinnipeds. At the Neptune Islands, South Australia, large numbers of white sharks can be sighted throughout the year, including during periods of low seal abundance. We use a combination of photo-identification and network analysis based on co-occurrence of individuals visiting the site on the same day to elucidate the population structure and aggregatory behaviour of Australia's largest aggregation of sub-adult and adult white sharks. We photo-identified 282 sharks (183 males, 97 females, 2 unknown) over a 4.5-year period (June 2010-November 2014) and found that white sharks did not randomly co-occur with their conspecifics, but formed four distinct communities. Tendency to co-occur varied across months with males co-occurring with more individuals than females. Sex-dependent patterns of visitation at the Neptune Islands and resulting intraspecific competition likely drive the observed community structure and temporal variability in co-occurrences. This study provides new insights into the aggregatory behaviour of white sharks at a seal colony and shows for the first time that white shark co-occurrence can be non-random.  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2654  
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