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Auteur (up) Olson, R.J.; Young, J.W.; Menard, F.; Potier, M.; Allain, V.; Goni, N.; Logan, J.M.; Galvan-Magana, F.
Titre Bioenergetics, Trophic Ecology, and Niche Separation of Tunas Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages 199-344
Mots-Clés albacore thunnus-alalunga; atlantic bluefin tuna; eastern tropical pacific; fish aggregation devices; gulf-of-mexico; large pelagic fishes; oceanic top predators; predator-prey interactions; satellite archival tags; western indian-ocean
Résumé Tunas are highly specialized predators that have evolved numerous adaptations for a lifestyle that requires large amounts of energy consumption. Here we review our understanding of the bioenergetics and feeding dynamics of tunas on a global scale, with an emphasis on yellowfin, bigeye, skipjack, albacore, and Atlantic bluefin tunas. Food consumption balances bioenergetics expenditures for respiration, growth (including gonad production), specific dynamic action, egestion, and excretion. Tunas feed across the micronekton and some large zooplankton. Some tunas appear to time their life history to take advantage of ephemeral aggregations of crustacean, fish, and molluscan prey. Ontogenetic and spatial diet differences are substantial, and significant interdecadal changes in prey composition have been observed. Diet shifts from larger to smaller prey taxa highlight ecosystem-wide changes in prey availability and diversity and provide implications for changing bioenergetics requirements into the future. Where tunas overlap, we show evidence of niche separation between them; resources are divided largely by differences in diet percentages and size ranges of prey taxa. The lack of long-term data limits the ability to predict impacts of climate change on tuna feeding behaviour. We note the need for systematic collection of feeding data as part of routine monitoring of these species, and we highlight the advantages of using biochemical techniques for broad-scale analyses of trophic relations. We support the continued development of ecosystem models, which all too often lack the regional-specific trophic data needed to adequately investigate climate and fishing impacts.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 74
Volume de collection 74 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-803607-5 Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1661
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Auteur (up) Oppel, S.; Bolton, M.; Carneiro, A.P.B.; Dias, M.P.; Green, J.A.; Masello, J.F.; Phillips, R.A.; Owen, E.; Quillfeldt, P.; Beard, A.; Bertrand, S.; Blackburn, J.; Boersma, P.D.; Borges, A.; Broderick, A.C.; Catry, P.; Cleasby, I.; Clingham, E.; Creuwels, J.; Crofts, S.; Cuthbert, R.J.; Dallmeijer, H.; Davies, D.; Davies, R.; Dilley, B.J.; Dinis, H.A.; Dossa, J.; Dunn, M.J.; Efe, M.A.; Fayet, A.L.; Figueiredo, L.; Frederico, A.P.; Gjerdrum, C.; Godley, B.J.; Granadeiro, J.P.; Guilford, T.; Hamer, K.C.; Hazin, C.; Hedd, A.; Henry, L.; Hernández-Montero, M.; Hinke, J.; Kokubun, N.; Leat, E.; Tranquilla, L.M.F.; Metzger, B.; Militão, T.; Montrond, G.; Mullié, W.; Padget, O.; Pearmain, E.J.; Pollet, I.L.; Pütz, K.; Quintana, F.; Ratcliffe, N.; Ronconi, R.A.; Ryan, P.G.; Saldanha, S.; Shoji, A.; Sim, J.; Small, C.; Soanes, L.; Takahashi, A.; Trathan, P.; Trivelpiece, W.; Veen, J.; Wakefield, E.; Weber, N.; Weber, S.; Zango, L.; Daunt, F.; Ito, M.; Harris, M.P.; Newell, M.A.; Wanless, S.; González-Solís, J.; Croxall, J.
Titre Spatial scales of marine conservation management for breeding seabirds Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume 98 Numéro Pages 37-46
Mots-Clés Foraging range; Marine protected area; Spatial aggregation; Telemetry; Tracking; Value of information
Résumé Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient. Here the space use patterns of seabirds were examined to provide guidance on whether conservation management approaches should be tailored for taxonomic groups with different movement characteristics. Seabird tracking data were synthesised from 5419 adult breeding individuals of 52 species in ten families that were collected in the Atlantic Ocean basin between 1998 and 2017. Two key aspects of spatial distribution were quantified, namely how far seabirds ranged from their colony, and to what extent individuals from the same colony used the same areas at sea. There was evidence for substantial differences in patterns of space-use among the ten studied seabird families, indicating that several alternative conservation management approaches are needed. Several species exhibited large foraging ranges and little aggregation at sea, indicating that area-based conservation solutions would have to be extremely large to adequately protect such species. The results highlight that short-ranging and aggregating species such as cormorants, auks, some penguins, and gulls would benefit from conservation approaches at relatively small spatial scales during their breeding season. However, improved regulation of fisheries, bycatch, pollution and other threats over large spatial scales will be needed for wide-ranging and dispersed species such as albatrosses, petrels, storm petrels and frigatebirds.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2454
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Auteur (up) Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Deneubourg, J.L.
Titre The aggregation of tuna around floating objects: What could be the underlying social mechanisms? Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology
Volume 359 Numéro Pages 161-170
Mots-Clés Fish Aggregating Devices; Models of aggregation; Monte Carlo multi-agents simulations; Social behavior
Résumé Several empirical and theoretical studies have shown how the exploitation of food sources, the choice of resting sites or other types of collective decision-making in heterogeneous environments are facilitated and modulated by social interactions between conspecifics. It is well known that many pelagic fishes live in schools and that this form of gregarious behavior provides advantages in terms of food intake and predator avoidance efficiency. However, the influence of social behavior in the formation of aggregations by tuna under floating objects (FOBs) is poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the collective patterns generated by different theoretical models, which either include or exclude social interactions between conspecifics, in the presence of two aggregation sites. The resulting temporal dynamics and distributions of populations were compared to in situ observations of tuna behavior. Our work suggests that social interactions should be incorporated in aggregative behavior to reproduce the temporal patterns observed in the field at both the individual and the group level, challenging the common vision of tuna aggregations around FOBs. Our study argues for additional data to further demonstrate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of these fish aggregations. Understanding the interplay between environmental and social factors in the associative behavior of fish with FOBs is necessary to assess the consequences of the widespread deployment of artificial FOBs by fishermen.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-5193 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 393
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Auteur (up) Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Lopez, J.; Moreno, G.; Deneubourg, J.L.
Titre Does social behavior influence the dynamics of aggregations formed by tropical tunas around floating objects ? An experimental approach Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 440 Numéro Pages 238-243
Mots-Clés Aggregation; Binary choice; FADs; Social behavior; tuna
Résumé Tropical tunas associate with objects floating at the surface of the ocean, a behavior widely exploited by fishers. However, the respective roles played by environmental variables and behavioral processes (e.g., social behavior) in the formation of these aggregations remain elusive. To investigate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of such aggregations, we used the binary choice approach. The experimental design comprised two close and identical anchored fish aggregating devices (FADS) equipped with an echo sounder buoy to monitor the aggregated biomass of tuna under each device. Analysis of the results entailed characterizing whether the aggregated biomass is distributed asymmetrically (indicative of social behavior playing a role in the dynamics) or symmetrically between the two close and identical FADs, and comparing the results with theoretical distributions based on different definitions of basic units (individual fish or small schools). The results suggest that social interactions underlie aggregation processes, which represents a major advance in our understanding of these aggregations, a priority for science-based fishery management. While recognizing the logistical and technical constraints, we encourage the development of experimental studies (e.g., in which animals are presented with controlled situations) to enhance our understanding of the behavior of large pelagic fish.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 249
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Auteur (up) Schilds, A.; Mourier, J.; Huveneers, C.; Nazimi, L.; Fox, A.; Leu, S.T.
Titre Evidence for non-random co-occurrences in a white shark aggregation Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol.
Volume 73 Numéro 10 Pages Unsp-138
Mots-Clés Aggregation; association patterns; behavior; Carcharodon carcharias; carcharodon-carcharias; dispersion; evolution; Gregariousness; neptune islands; Photo-ID; population-structure; segregation; Social behaviour; social interactions; Social network analysis; zealand fur-seal
Résumé Groups or aggregations of animals can result from individuals being attracted to a common resource or because of synchronised patterns of daily or seasonal activity. Although mostly solitary throughout its distribution, white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) seasonally aggregate at a number of sites worldwide to feed on calorie-rich pinnipeds. At the Neptune Islands, South Australia, large numbers of white sharks can be sighted throughout the year, including during periods of low seal abundance. We use a combination of photo-identification and network analysis based on co-occurrence of individuals visiting the site on the same day to elucidate the population structure and aggregatory behaviour of Australia's largest aggregation of sub-adult and adult white sharks. We photo-identified 282 sharks (183 males, 97 females, 2 unknown) over a 4.5-year period (June 2010-November 2014) and found that white sharks did not randomly co-occur with their conspecifics, but formed four distinct communities. Tendency to co-occur varied across months with males co-occurring with more individuals than females. Sex-dependent patterns of visitation at the Neptune Islands and resulting intraspecific competition likely drive the observed community structure and temporal variability in co-occurrences. This study provides new insights into the aggregatory behaviour of white sharks at a seal colony and shows for the first time that white shark co-occurrence can be non-random.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000490589200001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2654
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