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Auteur Cowart, D.A.; Durand, L.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre (up) Investigation of bacterial communities within the digestive organs of the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata provide insights into holobiont geographic clustering Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS One
Volume 12 Numéro 3 Pages e0172543
Mots-Clés alignment; chamber; deposits; diversity; Ecology; microbial community; mid-atlantic ridge; population; sequence data; sp nov.
Résumé Prokaryotic communities forming symbiotic relationships with the vent shrimp, Rimicaris exoculata, are well studied components of hydrothermal ecosystems at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Despite the tight link between host and symbiont, the observed lack of spatial genetic structure seen in R. exoculata contrasts with the geographic differentiation detected in specific bacterial ectosymbionts. The geographic clustering of bacterial lineages within a seemingly panmictic host suggests either the presence of finer scale restriction to gene flow not yet detected in the host, horizontal transmission (environmental selection) of its endosymbionts as a consequence of unique vent geochemistry, or vertically transmitted endosymbionts that exhibit genetic differentiation. To identify which hypothesis best fits, we tested whether bacterial assemblages exhibit differentiation across sites or host populations by performing a 16S rRNA metabarcoding survey on R. exoculata digestive prokaryote samples (n = 31) taken from three geochemically distinct vents across MAR: Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) and Logatchev. Analysis of communities across two organs (digestive tract, stomach), three molt colors (white, red, black) and three life stages (eggs, juveniles, adults) also provided insights into symbiont transmission mode. Examining both whole communities and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) confirmed the presence of three main epibionts: Epsilonproteobacteria, Mollicutes and Deferribacteres. With these findings, we identified a clear pattern of geographic segregation by vent in OTUs assigned to Epsilonproteobacteria. Additionally, we detected evidence for differentiation among all communities associated to vents and life stages. Overall, results suggest a combination of environmental selection and vertical inheritance of some of the symbiotic lineages.
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Auteur GAERTNER, J.-C.; MAIORANO, P.; Mérigot, B.; COLLOCA, F.; POLITOU, C.-Y.; GIL DE SOLA, L.; BERTRAND, J.; MURENU, M.; DURBEC, J.-P.; KALLIANIOTIS, A.; MANNINI, A.
Titre (up) Large-Scale Diversity of Slope Fishes: Pattern Inconsistency between Multiple Diversity Indices Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 8 Numéro 7 Pages
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Résumé Large-scale studies focused on the diversity of continental slope ecosystems are still rare, usually restricted to a limited number of diversity indices and mainly based on the empirical comparison of heterogeneous local data sets. In contrast, we investigate large-scale fish diversity on the basis of multiple diversity indices and using 1454 standardized trawl hauls collected throughout the upper and middle slope of the whole northern Mediterranean Sea (36 degrees 3' – 45 degrees 7' N; 5 degrees 3'W – 28 degrees E). We have analyzed (1) the empirical relationships between a set of 11 diversity indices in order to assess their degree of complementarity/redundancy and (2) the consistency of spatial patterns exhibited by each of the complementary groups of indices. Regarding species richness, our results contrasted both the traditional view based on the hump-shaped theory for bathymetric pattern and the commonly-admitted hypothesis of a large-scale decreasing trend correlated with a similar gradient of primary production in the Mediterranean Sea. More generally, we found that the components of slope fish diversity we analyzed did not always show a consistent pattern of distribution according either to depth or to spatial areas, suggesting that they are not driven by the same factors. These results, which stress the need to extend the number of indices traditionally considered in diversity monitoring networks, could provide a basis for rethinking not only the methodological approach used in monitoring systems, but also the definition of priority zones for protection. Finally, our results call into question the feasibility of properly investigating large-scale diversity patterns using a widespread approach in ecology, which is based on the compilation of pre-existing heterogeneous and disparate data sets, in particular when focusing on indices that are very sensitive to sampling design standardization, such as species richness.
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Notes <p>The following values have no corresponding Zotero field:<br />Author Address: Univ Polynesie Francaise, UPF,IRD,Ifremer,ILM, UMR EIO 241, Faaa, Tahiti, Fr Polynesia.<br />Author Address: Ctr Arue, IRD, UPF,IRD,Ifremer,ILM, UMR EIO 241, Papeete, Tahiti, Fr Polynesia.<br />Author Address: Univ Bari, Dept Zool, Bari, Italy.<br />Author Address: Ctr Rech Halieut Mediterrane enne & Trop, UMR Ecosyst Marins Exploites 212, Sete, France.<br />Author Address: Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dept Anim & Human Biol, I-00185 Rome, Italy.<br />Author Address: Inst Marine Biol Resources, Hellen Ctr Marine Res, Ellinikon, Greece.<br />Author Address: Ctr Oceanog Malaga IEO, Fuengirola, Malaga, Spain.<br />Author Address: IFREMER, Dept Ecol & Modeles Halieut, Nantes, France.<br />Author Address: Univ Cagliari, Dipartimento Biol Anim & Ecol, Cagliari, Italy.<br />Author Address: Univ Aix Marseille, UMR MIO, Ctr Oceanol Marseille, Marseille, France.<br />Author Address: Natl Agr Res Fdn, Fisheries Res Inst, Kavala, Greece.<br />Author Address: Univ Genoa, Dip Te Ris, Genoa, Italy.<br />PB – Public Library Science</p> Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 287
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Auteur Maufroy, A.; Chassot, E.; Joo, R.; Kaplan, D.M.
Titre (up) Large-Scale Examination of Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (dFADs) from Tropical Tuna Fisheries of the Indian and Atlantic Oceans Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS ONE
Volume 10 Numéro 5 Pages e0128023
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Résumé Since the 1990s, massive use of drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (dFADs) to aggregate tropical tunas has strongly modified global purse-seine fisheries. For the first time, a large data set of GPS positions from buoys deployed by French purse-seiners to monitor dFADs is analysed to provide information on spatio-temporal patterns of dFAD use in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans during 2007-2011. First, we select among four classification methods the model that best separates “at sea” from “on board” buoy positions. A random forest model had the best performance, both in terms of the rate of false “at sea” predictions and the amount of over-segmentation of “at sea” trajectories (i.e., artificial division of trajectories into multiple, shorter pieces due to misclassification). Performance is improved via post-processing removing unrealistically short “at sea” trajectories. Results derived from the selected model enable us to identify the main areas and seasons of dFAD deployment and the spatial extent of their drift. We find that dFADs drift at sea on average for 39.5 days, with time at sea being shorter and distance travelled longer in the Indian than in the Atlantic Ocean. 9.9% of all trajectories end with a beaching event, suggesting that 1,500-2,000 may be lost onshore each year, potentially impacting sensitive habitat areas, such as the coral reefs of the Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and the Seychelles.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1332
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Auteur Keller, S.; BARTOLINO, V.; HIDALGO, M.; BITETTO, I.; CASCIARO, L.; CUCCU, D.; ESTEBAN, A.; GARCIA, C.; GAROFALO, G.; JOSEPHIDES, M.; JADAUD, A.; LEFKADITOU, E.; MAIORANO, P.; MANFREDI, C.; MARCETA, B.; MASSUT, E.; MICALLEF, R.; PERISTERAKI, P.; RELINI, G.; SARTOR, P.; SPEDICATO, M.T.; TSERPES, G.; QUETGLAS, A.
Titre (up) Large-scale spatio-temporal patterns of Mediterranean cephalopod diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 11 Numéro 1 Pages
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Résumé Species diversity is widely recognized as an important trait of ecosystems’ functioning and resilience. Understanding the causes of diversity patterns and their interaction with the environmental conditions is essential in order to effectively assess and preserve existing diversity. While diversity patterns of most recurrent groups such as fish are commonly studied, other important taxa such as cephalopods have received less attention. In this work we present spatio-temporal trends of cephalopod diversity across the entire Mediterranean Sea during the last 19 years, analysing data from the annual bottom trawl survey MEDITS conducted by 5 different Mediterranean countries using standardized gears and sampling protocols. The influence of local and regional environmental variability in different Mediterranean regions is analysed applying generalized additive models, using species richness and the Shannon Wiener index as diversity descriptors. While the western basin showed a high diversity, our analyses do not support a steady eastward decrease of diversity as proposed in some previous studies. Instead, high Shannon diversity was also found in the Adriatic and Aegean Seas, and high species richness in the eastern Ionian Sea. Overall diversity did not show any consistent trend over the last two decades. Except in the Adriatic Sea, diversity showed a hump-shaped trend with depth in all regions, being highest between 200-400 m depth. Our results indicate that high Chlorophyll a concentrations and warmer temperatures seem to enhance species diversity, and the influence of these parameters is stronger for richness than for Shannon diversity.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1517
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Auteur Darnaude, A.M.; Sturrock, A.; Trueman, C.N.; Mouillot, D.; Eimf; Campana, S.E.; Hunter, E.
Titre (up) Listening In on the Past: What Can Otolith δ18O Values Really Tell Us about the Environmental History of Fishes? Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée PLoS ONE
Volume 9 Numéro 10 Pages
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Résumé Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith δ18O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water δ18O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory data gathered from a decade using archival tags to study the behaviour of adult plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) in the North Sea. Based on the tag-derived monthly distributions of the fish and corresponding temperature and salinity estimates modelled across three consecutive years, we first predicted annual otolith δ18O values for three geographically discrete offshore sub-stocks, using three alternative plausible scenarios for otolith growth. Comparison of predicted vs. measured annual δ18O values demonstrated >96% correct prediction of sub-stock membership, irrespective of the otolith growth scenario. Pronounced inter-stock differences in δ18O values, notably in summer, provide a robust marker for reconstructing broad-scale plaice distribution in the North Sea. However, although largely congruent, measured and predicted annual δ18O values of did not fully match. Small, but consistent, offsets were also observed between individual high-resolution otolith δ18O values measured during tag recording time and corresponding δ18O predictions using concomitant tag-recorded temperatures and location-specific salinity estimates. The nature of the shifts differed among sub-stocks, suggesting specific vital effects linked to variation in physiological response to temperature. Therefore, although otolith δ18O in free-ranging fish largely reflects environmental temperature and salinity, we counsel prudence when interpreting otolith δ18O data for stock discrimination or temperature reconstruction until the mechanisms underpinning otolith δ18O signature acquisition, and associated variation, are clarified.
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