|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur (up) Dhellemmes, F.; Hansen, M.J.; Bouet, S.D.; Videler, J.J.; Domenici, P.; Steffensen, J.F.; Hildebrandt, T.; Fritsch, G.; Bach, P.; Sabarros, P.S.; Krüger, A.; Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Krause, J.
Titre Oil gland and oil pores in billfishes: in search of a function Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 223 Numéro 19 Pages
Mots-Clés
Résumé Skip to Next Section

Billfishes are well known for their distinctive elongated rostra, i.e. bills. The functional significance of billfish rostra has been frequently discussed and the recent discovery of an oil gland (glandula oleofera) at the base of the rostrum in swordfish, Xiphias gladius, has added an interesting facet to this discussion regarding the potential co-evolution of gland and rostra. Here, we investigated the oil gland and oil pores (through which the oil is brought to the skin surface) of four billfish species – swordfish, Atlantic blue marlin (Makaira nigricans), Indo-Pacific sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) and striped marlin (Kajikia audax) – and provide detailed evidence for the presence of an oil gland in the last three. All four species had a high density of oil pores on the forehead which is consistent with the hypothesis of hydrodynamic benefits of the oil. The extension of the pores onto the front half of the rostrum in sailfish and striped marlin, but not in swordfish or blue marlin, suggests that the oil may have additional functions. One such function could be linked to the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of the oil. However, the available evidence on predatory rostrum use (and hence the likelihood of tissue damage) is only partly consistent with the extension of pores on rostra across species. We conclude that the oil gland probably serves multiple, non-mutually exclusive functions. More detailed information on rostrum use in blue marlin and swordfish is needed to better link behavioural and morphological data with the aim of accomplishing a full comparative analysis.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949, 1477-9145 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2917
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Dupont-Prinet, A.; Chatain, B.; Grima, L.; Vandeputte, M.; Claireaux, G.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Physiological mechanisms underlying a trade-off between growth rate and tolerance of feed deprivation in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 213 Numéro 7 Pages 1143-1152
Mots-Clés
Résumé The specific growth rate (SGR) of a cohort of 2000 tagged juvenile European sea bass was measured in a common tank, during two sequential cycles comprising three-weeks feed deprivation followed by three-weeks ad libitum re-feeding. After correction for initial size at age as fork length, there was a direct correlation between negative SGR (rate of mass loss) during feed deprivation and positive SGR (rate of compensatory growth) during re-feeding (Spearman rank correlation R=0.388, P=0.000002). Following a period of rearing under standard culture conditions, individuals representing 'high growth' phenotypes (GP) and 'high tolerance of feed deprivation' phenotypes (DP) were selected from either end of the SGR spectrum. Static and swimming respirometry could not demonstrate lower routine or standard metabolic rate in DP to account for greater tolerance of feed deprivation. Increased rates of compensatory growth in GP were not linked to greater maximum metabolic rate, aerobic metabolic scope or maximum cardiac performance than DP. When fed a standard ration, however, GP completed the specific dynamic action (SDA) response significantly faster than DP. Therefore, higher growth rate in GP was linked to greater capacity to process food. There was no difference in SDA coefficient, an indicator of energetic efficiency. The results indicate that individual variation in growth rate in sea bass reflects, in part, a trade-off against tolerance of food deprivation. The two phenotypes represented the opposing ends of a spectrum. The GP aims to exploit available resources and grow as rapidly as possible but at a cost of physiological and/or behavioural attributes, which lead to increased energy dissipation when food is not available. An opposing strategy, exemplified by DP, is less 'boom and bust', with a lower physiological capacity to exploit resources but which is less costly to sustain during periods of food deprivation.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 782
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Fast growers sprint slower: effects of food deprivation and re-feeding on sprint swimming performance in individual juvenile European sea bass Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 217 Numéro 6 Pages 859-865
Mots-Clés Compensatory growth; Ecophysiology; Food deprivation; Foraging; Locomotion; atlantic; catch-up growth; cod; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecological performance; gadus-morhua; long-term starvation; metabolic responses; salmon; teleost fish; trade-off; trade-offs; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé While many ectothermic species can withstand prolonged fasting without mortality, food deprivation may have sublethal effects of ecological importance, including reductions in locomotor ability. Little is known about how such changes in performance in individual animals are related to either mass loss during food deprivation or growth rate during re-feeding. This study followed changes in the maximum sprint swimming performance of individual European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, throughout 45 days of food deprivation and 30 days of re-feeding. Maximum sprint speed did not show a significant decline until 45 days of food deprivation. Among individuals, the reduction in sprinting speed at this time was not related to mass loss. After 30 days of re-feeding, mean sprinting speed had recovered to match that of control fish. Among individuals, however, maximum sprinting speed was negatively correlated with growth rate after the resumption of feeding. This suggests that the rapid compensatory growth that occurs during re-feeding after a prolonged fast carries a physiological cost in terms of reduced sprinting capacity, the extent of which shows continuous variation among individuals in relation to growth rate. The long-term repeatability of maximum sprint speed was low when fish were fasted or fed a maintenance ration, but was high among control fish fed to satiation. Fish that had been previously food deprived continued to show low repeatability in sprinting ability even after the initiation of ad libitum feeding, probably stemming from variation in compensatory growth among individuals and its associated negative effects on sprinting ability. Together, these results suggest that food limitation can disrupt hierarchies of maximum sprint performance within populations. In the wild, the cumulative effects on locomotor capacity of fasting and re-feeding could lead to variable survival among individuals with different growth trajectories following a period of food deprivation.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 601
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Marras, S.; Claireaux, G.; McKenzie, D.J.; Nelson, J.A.
Titre Individual variation and repeatability in aerobic and anaerobic swimming performance of European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 213 Numéro 1 Pages 26-32
Mots-Clés
Résumé Studies of inter-individual variation in fish swimming performance may provide insight into how selection has influenced diversity in phenotypic traits. We investigated individual variation and short-term repeatability of individual swimming performance by wild European sea bass in a constant acceleration test (CAT). Fish were challenged with four consecutive CATs with 5. min rest between trials. We measured maximum anaerobic speed at exhaustion (U(CAT)), gait transition speed from steady aerobic to unsteady anaerobic swimming (U(gt)), routine metabolic rate (RMR), post-CAT maximum metabolic rate (MMR), aerobic scope and recovery time from the CATs. Fish achieved significantly higher speeds during the first CAT (U(CAT)=170 cm s(-1)), and had much more inter-individual variation in performance (coefficient of variation, CV=18.43%) than in the subsequent three tests (U(CAT)=134 cm s(-1); CV=7.3%), which were very repeatable among individuals. The individual variation in U(CAT) in the first trial could be accounted for almost exclusively by variation in anaerobic burst-and-coast performance beyond U(gt). The U(gt) itself varied substantially between individuals (CV=11.4%), but was significantly repeatable across all four trials. Individual RMR and MMR varied considerably, but the rank order of post-CAT MMR was highly repeatable. Recovery rate from the four CATs was highly variable and correlated positively with the first U(CAT) (longer recovery for higher speeds) but negatively with RMR and aerobic scope (shorter recovery for higher RMR and aerobic scope). This large variation in individual performance coupled with the strong correlations between some of the studied variables may reflect divergent selection favouring alternative strategies for foraging and avoiding predation.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 681
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) McKenzie, D.J.; Vergnet, A.; Chatain, B.; Vandeputte, M.; Desmarais, E.; Steffensen, J.F.; Guinand, B.
Titre Physiological mechanisms underlying individual variation in tolerance of food deprivation in juvenile European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology
Volume 217 Numéro 18 Pages 3283-3292
Mots-Clés
Résumé Although food deprivation is a major ecological pressure in fishes, there is wide individual variation in tolerance of fasting, whose mechanistic bases are poorly understood. Two thousand individually tagged juvenile European sea bass were submitted to two ‘fasting/feeding’ cycles each comprising 3 weeks of food deprivation followed by 3 weeks of ad libitum feeding at 25°C. Rates of mass loss during the two fasting periods were averaged for each individual to calculate a population mean. Extreme fasting tolerant (FT) and sensitive (FS) phenotypes were identified that were at least one and a half standard deviations, on opposing sides, from this mean. Respirometry was used to investigate two main hypotheses: (1) tolerance of food deprivation reflects lower mass-corrected routine metabolic rate (RMR) in FT phenotypes when fasting, and (2) tolerance reflects differences in substrate utilisation; FT phenotypes use relatively less proteins as metabolic fuels during fasting, measured as their ammonia quotient (AQ), the simultaneous ratio of ammonia excretion to RMR. There was no difference in mean RMR between FT and FS over 7 days fasting, being 6.70±0.24 mmol h−1 fish−1 (mean ± s.e.m., N=18) versus 6.76±0.22 mmol h−1 fish−1 (N=17), respectively, when corrected to a body mass of 130 g. For any given RMR, however, the FT lost mass at a significantly lower rate than FS, overall 7-day average being 0.72±0.05 versus 0.90±0.05 g day−1 fish−1, respectively (P<0.01, t-test). At 20 h after receiving a ration equivalent to 2% body mass as food pellets, ammonia excretion and simultaneous RMR were elevated and similar in FT and FS, with AQs of 0.105±0.009 and 0.089±0.007, respectively. At the end of the period of fasting, ammonia excretion and RMR had fallen in both phenotypes, but AQ was significantly lower in FT than FS, being 0.038±0.004 versus 0.061±0.005, respectively (P<0.001, t-test). There was a direct linear relationship between individual fasted AQ and rate of mass loss, with FT and FS individuals distributed at opposing lower and upper extremities, respectively. Thus the difference between the phenotypes in their tolerance of food deprivation did not depend upon their routine energy use when fasting. Rather, it depended upon their relative use of tissue proteins as metabolic fuels when fasting, which was significantly lower in FT phenotypes.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 773
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement