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Auteur (up) Elleouet, J.; Albouy, C.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Mouillot, D.; Leprieur, F. url  doi
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  Titre A trait-based approach for assessing and mapping niche overlap between native and exotic species: the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna as a case study Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume 20 Numéro 11 Pages 1333-1344  
  Mots-Clés Biological invasions; coastal fishes; endemic species; exotic species; functional traits; Mediterranean Sea; niche overlap  
  Résumé Aim We propose a trait-based approach for assessing and mapping potential niche overlap between native and exotic species at large spatial scales. Location The Mediterranean Sea. Methods We developed two complementary indices based on ecological, biological and ecomorphological similarities between native and exotic species. The first index (FNNr) allows identifying areas where native species are the most at risk in terms of potential ecological interactions with exotic species. The second index (FGO) is species-specific and allows identifying native species that display the broadest functional niche overlap and range overlap with exotic species. We illustrated our approach using the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna as a case study. Results We found that endemic and exotic fishes had a similar global functional niche at the Mediterranean scale, that is, they filled the same functional space defined by trait axes. FNNr hotspots were found to be moderately congruent with exotic species richness hotspots. Higher values of FNNr were observed along the coasts of the Levantine Sea. The computation of the FGO index showed that the geographical range of a given endemic species overlapped in average with 52 exotic species. Species showing the highest FGO values displayed localized and/or fragmented distributions in the eastern Mediterranean basin. Main conclusions Our findings suggest that the number of exotic species alone cannot be used as a broad-scale indicator of potential impact because this metric does not account for functional relatedness between native and exotic species. The trait-based indices developed in this study can be used for other taxa in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and should help environmental managers to set up local-scale studies on areas where the potential impact of exotic species on native biodiversity is the highest.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1165  
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Auteur (up) Peron, C.; Authier, M.; Gremillet, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Testing the transferability of track-based habitat models for sound marine spatial planning Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity And Distributions  
  Volume 24 Numéro 12 Pages 1772-1787  
  Mots-Clés  
  Résumé Aim Species distribution models (SDMs) are statistical tools aiming at mapping and predicting species distributions across landscapes. Data acquisition being limited in space and time, SDM are commonly used to predict species distribution in unsampled areas or years, with the expectation that modelled habitat-species relationships will hold across spatial or temporal contexts (i.e., model transferability). This key aspect of habitat modelling has major implications for spatial management, yet it has received limited attention, especially in the dynamic marine realm. Our aims were to test geographical and temporal habitat model transferability and to make recommendations for future population-scale habitat modelling. Location Methods Two contrasted regions of the North Western Mediterranean Sea: the cold and productive waters of the Gulf of Lion, and the warm and oligotrophic waters of Corsica. We GPS-tracked 189 Scopoli's shearwaters, Calonectris diomedea, at four breeding sites during the chick-rearing period in 2011 and 2012 (418 foraging trips), and analysed their fine-scale foraging behaviour. We then built colony-specific habitat models (GAMMs) to test SDM geographical and temporal transferability and investigated the effect of extrinsic (environmental extrapolation) and intrinsic (trip characteristics) factors on transferability. Results Main conclusions Scopoli's shearwaters from our four study sites had comparable foraging strategies (as assessed from trip characteristics and isotopic diet tracers). Despite such similarities, SDMs revealed colony-specific habitat associations. Geographical and temporal model transferability was better within than between regions. Crucially, our study illustrates how habitat-species relationships can vary between colonies located <200 km apart, and underlines the effect of spatio-temporal extrapolation in habitat modelling. We therefore warn that defining adequate spatial scales for model predictions is critical to sound marine spatial planning and conservation.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2464  
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Auteur (up) Pool, T.K.; Grenouillet, G.; Villeger, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Species contribute differently to the taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic alpha and beta diversity of freshwater fish communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume 20 Numéro 11 Pages 1235-1244  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; fish conservation; functional and phylogenetic diversity  
  Résumé  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1172  
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Auteur (up) Stephenson, F.; Goetz, K.; Sharp, B.R.; Mouton, T.L.; Beets, F.L.; Roberts, J.; MacDiarmid, A.B.; Constantine, R.; Lundquist, C.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Modelling the spatial distribution of cetaceans in New Zealand waters Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume 26 Numéro 4 Pages 495-516  
  Mots-Clés boosted regression tree models; cetacean distribution; New Zealand; relative environmental suitability models; spatial management; species distribution models  
  Résumé Aim Cetaceans are inherently difficult to study due to their elusive, pelagic and often highly migratory nature. New Zealand waters are home to 50% of the world's cetacean species, but their spatial distributions are poorly known. Here, we model distributions of 30 cetacean taxa using an extensive at-sea sightings dataset (n > 14,000) and high-resolution (1 km2) environmental data layers. Location New Zealand's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Methods Two models were used to predict probability of species occurrence based on available sightings records. For taxa with <50 sightings (n = 15), Relative Environmental Suitability (RES), and for taxa with ≥50 sightings (n = 15), Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) models were used. Independently collected presence/absence data were used for further model evaluation for a subset of taxa. Results RES models for rarely sighted species showed reasonable fits to available sightings and stranding data based on literature and expert knowledge on the species' autecology. BRT models showed high predictive power for commonly sighted species (AUC: 0.79–0.99). Important variables for predicting the occurrence of cetacean taxa were temperature residuals, bathymetry, distance to the 500 m isobath, mixed layer depth and water turbidity. Cetacean distribution patterns varied from highly localised, nearshore (e.g., Hector's dolphin), to more ubiquitous (e.g., common dolphin) to primarily offshore species (e.g., blue whale). Cetacean richness based on stacked species occurrence layers illustrated patterns of fewer inshore taxa with localised richness hotspots, and higher offshore richness especially in locales of the Macquarie Ridge, Bounty Trough and Chatham Rise. Main conclusions Predicted spatial distributions fill a major knowledge gap towards informing future assessments and conservation planning for cetaceans in New Zealand's extensive EEZ. While sightings datasets were not spatially comprehensive for any taxa, these two best available approaches allow for predictive modelling of both more common, and of rarely sighted, cetacean species with limited available information.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000510589200001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2692  
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Auteur (up) Zupan, L.; Cabeza, M.; Maiorano, L.; Roquet, C.; Devictor, V.; Lavergne, S.; Mouillot, D.; Mouquet, N.; Renaud, J.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Spatial mismatch of phylogenetic diversity across three vertebrate groups and protected areas in Europe Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume 20 Numéro 6 Pages 674-685  
  Mots-Clés Europe; Species diversity; approach; biodiversity; climate-change; communities; ecological; evolutionary diversity; functional diversity; global patterns; hotspots; nature conservation; phylogenetic diversity; protected areas; spatial biodiversity congruence; species richness; terrestrial vertebrates; unified  
  Résumé Aim We investigate patterns of phylogenetic diversity in relation to species diversity for European birds, mammals and amphibians to evaluate their congruence and highlight areas of particular evolutionary history. We estimate the extent to which the European network of protected areas (PAs) network retains interesting evolutionary history areas for the three groups separately and simultaneously. Location Europe Methods Phylogenetic (QE(PD)) and species diversity (SD) were estimated using the Rao's quadratic entropy at 10 ' resolution. We determined the regional relationship between QE(PD) and SD for each taxa with a spatial regression model and used the tails of the residuals (QE(RES)) distribution to identify areas of higher and lower QE(PD) than predicted. Spatial congruence of biodiversity between groups was assessed with Pearson correlation coefficient. A simple classification scheme allowed building a convergence map where a convergent pixel equalled to a QE(RES) value of the same sign for the three groups. This convergence map was overlaid to the current PAs network to estimate the level of protection in convergent pixels and compared it to a null expectation built on 1000 randomization of PAs over the landscape. Results QE(RES) patterns across vertebrates show a strong spatial mismatch highlighting different evolutionary histories. Convergent areas represent only 2.7% of the Western Palearctic, with only 8.4% of these areas being covered by the current PAs network while a random distribution would retain 10.4% of them. QE(RES) are unequally represented within PAs: areas with higher QE(PD) than predicted are better covered than expected, while low QE(PD) areas are undersampled. Main conclusions Patterns of diversity strongly diverge between groups of vertebrates in Europe. Although Europe has the world's most extensive PAs network, evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates is unequally protected. The challenge is now to reconcile effective conservation planning with a contemporary view of biodiversity integrating multiple facets.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1366-9516 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 856  
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